PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Tag Archives: Sebastian Bae

Armchair Dragoons: Teaching game design

The latest edition of the Armchair Dragoons podcast features a discussion with Sebastian Bae, Jeff Tidball, myself, and host Brant Guillory on teaching game design.

We discuss some of the key points that they want students take away from their design courses, some of the process they use to introduce different game ideas and concepts to the students, and the toolkits (in some cases, literally) that the students use for their game designs.  As a nod to the current reality we’re in, they also discuss the challenges of teaching these classes during a global pandemic that necessitates distance learning.

There’s a lot of things discussed here, but among them are the Aftershock game(reviewed by us here), the White Box design kit, Stephen Downes-Martin’s (in)famous “Three Witches” speech/paper, the Georgetown University Wargaming Society (whose forums are hosted by us and could use some more traffic), Jeff’s consulting work, the Brynania peacebuilding game, the diversity split in their classes, GUWS presentations for our digital conventions, and the constraints of trying to get a game design crammed into one semester.

Bae and Kearney: Wargaming to sharpen the tactical edge

At the US Army War College’s War Room, Sebastian Bae and Paul Kearney discuss using wargaming to sharpen the tactical edge.

Educational wargaming is increasingly prevalent in the pedagogical toolkit but remains concentrated at the higher levels of Professional Military Education (PME). Advanced PME institutions like the U.S. Army War College and the Marine Corps War College are admirably expanding game-based learning in their curricula. In contrast, educational wargaming remains generally underdeveloped and underutilized in the operational force. The majority of educational wargaming is confined to the classroom, far removed from frontline units. At the tactical edge, wargaming is generally limited to the military planning process and course of action analysis. The rare employment of educational wargaming within tactical units is episodic and limited in scope. Thus, to systemically reap the dividends of educational wargaming, the Joint Force should aim to reestablish the tradition of educational wargaming within tactical units. Success depends on senior leadership support in the form of institutional funding and enduring partnerships with wargaming organizations.

The use of wargames to teach both tactics and strategic thinking lies at the heart of professional wargaming. Wargames provide a dynamic environment to explore and examine a variety of challenges and concepts along the strategic, operational and tactical levels. As an educational tool, wargaming fosters critical thinking and innovation, but most of all, it helps prepare tactical leaders for future challenges.

Read the rest of what they have to say at the link above.

CIMSEC: Sebastian Bae on wargaming at Georgetown University (and elsewhere)

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The latest issue of the CIMSEC podcast Sea Control (#166) features Sebastian Bae discussing his wargaming course at Georgetown University and many other things as well.

Sebastian Bae (@SebastianBae) joins Jared (@jwsc03) to discuss his own development as a wargamer and designer, the genesis for Georgetown University’s new wargaming program, the Georgetown University Wargaming Society, the explosion of wargaming in both the academic world and Department of Defense and what he’s learned in his first year of teaching. One editor’s note: Nick Murray was identified as working for the Naval Postgraduate School during the podcast. He works for the Naval War College.

You can listen to it here.

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