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Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Category Archives: simulation and gaming journals

Simulation & Gaming (April 2017)

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The latest edition of Simulation & Gaming 48, 2 (April 2017) is now available online.

Editorial

Simulation and Gaming can be Used to Determine Validity While Engaging in Collaborative Environments
Timothy C. Clapper

Articles

Oasistan
Martin de Jong, Harald Warmelink

We’re Just Playing
Mike P. Cook, Matthew Gremo, Ryan Morgan

Assessing Gaming Simulation Validity for Training Traffic Controllers
G. van Lankveld, E. Sehic, J. C. Lo, S. A. Meijer  

Construct Development and Validation in Game-Based Research
Michael D. Coovert, Jennifer Winner, Winston Bennett

Governments Should Play Games
Lobna Hassan

Gaming Material Ready to Use

Simulating a Climate Engineering Crisis
Nils Matzner, Robert Herrenbrück

Simulation & Gaming (December 2016)

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 47, 6 (December 2016) is now available.

Editorial
Articles
Gaming Material Ready to Use

 

Simulation & Gaming, October 2016

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 47, 5 (October 2016) is now available. The issue is devoted to the topic of “service design games.”

Editorial
Symposium Articles
Case Example
Articles
News & Notes

Simulation & Gaming (August 2016)

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 47, 4 (August 2016) is now available.

Editorial
Articles
Gaming Material Ready to Use

Simulation & Gaming, July 2015

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 47, 3 (July 2016) is now available.

Articles
Gaming Material Ready to Use

 

Simulation & Gaming, April 2016

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 47, 2 (April 2016) is now available. This issue features a selection of papers first delivered at the International Simulation and Gaming Association’s (ISAGA) 2014 conference.


Symposium issue:
45th ISAGA Conference, July 2014, Dornbirn, Austria (Part 1)
Editorial
Articles

 

Simulation & Gaming, December 2015

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 46, 6 (December 2015) is now available. It is a special symposium issue devoted sustainable development.

  • Edutainment for Sustainable Development: A Survey of Games in the Field
    • Korina Katsaliaki and Navonil Mustafee
  • Ethical Thinking and Sustainability in Role-Play Participants: A Preliminary Study
    • Karen Schrier
  • Clarifying Sustainable Development Concepts Through Role-Play
    • Odile Blanchard and Arnaud Buchs
  • Communicating About Water Issues in Australia: A Simulation/Gaming Approach
    • Sondoss ElSawah, Alan McLucas, and Jason Mazanov
  • LAND RUSH: Simulating Negotiations Over Land Rights – A ready-to-use simulation
    • An Ansoms, Klara Claessens, Okke Bogaerts, and Sara Geenen
  • Managerial Myopia in Mismanaging Renewable Resources: The GONE FISHING Game
    • Federico Barnabè
  • Hybrid Active Learning Situations: Common Pools, Climate Change and Course Purposes
    • David Goetze
  • Possibilities and Limitations of Transferring an Educational Simulation Game to a Digital Platform
    • Ulrike Erb

Other Articles

  • Do Videogames Simulate? Virtuality and Imitation in the Philosophy of Simulation
    • Veli-Matti Karhulahti
  • Synchronous Mobile Audio-Visual Recording Technology (SMART) Cart for Healthcare Simulation Debriefing
    • Don Stephanian, Taylor Sawyer, Jennifer Reid, Kimberly Stone, Joan Roberts, Douglas Thompson, and Tom Pendergrass

Connections UK in MS&T

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The latest issue of Military Simulation & Training magazine has an extended article on the Connections UK interdisciplinary wargaming conference held at King’s College London in September. You’ll find it here.

Simulation & Gaming, June-August 2015

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 46, 3-4 (June-August 2015) has now been published. It is a special symposium issue on system dynamics and simulation/gaming.

Simulation & Gaming, April 2015

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 46, 2 (April 2015) is now available. This is a symposium issue devoted to Theory to Practice in Simulation.

Simulation & Gaming (February 2015) now available

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 46, 1 (February 2015) is now available. It includes a tribute to the late Donald Featherstone by John Curry of the History of Wargaming Project.

Tributes

PS: Political Science & Politics: Summary of TLC 2015 simulation and role play track

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The latest issue of PS: Political Science and Politics 48, 3 (July 2015) contains a summary of the simulation and role play track of the American Political Science Association’s 2015 Teaching and Learning Conference. We’ve reproduced it below at length. Each year the TLC includes a number of papers presentations and discussions on the use of simulations in teaching political science.

Simulation and Roleplay

Michelle Allendoerfer, George Washington University

Casey Delehanty, Florida State University

As in previous years, the 2015 Simulations and Role Play track served as an ideal arena for the presentation and discussion of active learning exercises for a variety of classroom environments. Track participants took care to integrate the lessons of previous years into the discussion, so as to build upon previous insights and identify recurring themes.One of the main themes of the track was the evaluation and implementation of simulations and games. Andrew Schlewitz and Joan Andorfer explored the degree to which substantive learning took hold within a Model OAS simulation and how these outcomes differed based on individual student characteristics. Chad Raymond compared the effectiveness of two different simulations in terms of their ability to cultivate empathy in students. Robbin Smith presented a fantastic US government simulation as well as pre- and post-test assessments of student learning outcomes. Michelle Allendoerfer used follow-up surveys to test the degree to which simulations were more-or-less effective than lecture in terms of increasing student retention.

Generally the results of these attempts at assessment were muddled. Studies of simulation effectiveness are continually plagued by “small-n” problems as well as the lack of true control groups, which poses problems for instructors who seek to “justify” the implementation of simulations and other active learning exercises in the classroom. While empirical analysis has yet to conclusively demonstrate the superiority of active learning techniques, it is generally the case that simulations are not worse for student learning than traditional techniques. Despite this muddled empirical record, track participants generally concluded that the increase in student enjoyment and engagement provoked by simulations is valuable in and of itself. While it may be difficult to empirically demonstrate the inherent value of active learning, the process in itself can generate positive student outcomes across a range of activities.

Gavin Mount’s “Simulating World Politics: Teaching as Research” presented the idea that simulations themselves can be used as sites of inquiry for students. While instructors often think of active learning exercises as delivery mechanisms for knowledge, deconstructing the institutional rules and implied norms of simulations themselves can be a productive method of debriefing students and encouraging critical thinking about political systems. Discussion then centered on the importance of debriefing: whether done as an in-class discussion or through personal reflective essay, instructors should allow students to discover the underlying themes and lessons from active learning rather than “telling.”

Finally, a number of presentations addressed the notion of adapting new or existing simulations to changing learning environments or goals. Gretchen Gee presented a simulation of Chechen terrorism for use in a “blended” classroom (a mix of online as well as classroom meetings), spurring an interesting discussion on the challenges of adapting active learning to non-traditional environments as classroom dynamics change. Nina Kollars, Victor Asal, Amanda Rosen, and Simon Usherwood demonstrated the flexibility of the Hobbes Game in terms of the learning goals it can be structured to evoke, demonstrating the degree to which small changes in simulation structure can beget new learning opportunities or goals.

The Simulations and Role Play track enjoyed a conference filled with rigorous discussions about how to effectively use simulations. Discussions surrounding assessment led to the general conclusion that as long as simulations seem to engage student learning and do not negatively effect learning outcomes, that a shift in the discussion to how to successfully create and execute simulations was in order. To that end, participants discussed how to effectively use debriefing strategies to engage students. Further, participants in the track concluded with a fruitful discussion of advantages and disadvantages of existing simulations that served a very practical purpose.

Next year’s TLC will take place in Portland, Oregon on 12-14 February 2016.

Simulation & Gaming, December 2014

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The latest edition of Simulation & Gaming 45, 6 (December 2014) is now available.

Articles

CounterFact magazine

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The first issue of CounterFact magazine is now available, published by One Small Step Games.

CounterFact magazine is a journal of professional and commercial wargaming. It is published approximately four times per year on an “as ready” basis. Each issue contains articles on professional and commercial wargaming to include game analysis, commentary, polemology, and provocative pieces on conflict and design theory. Also included in each issue is a manual wargame, usually consisting of a tabloid map-sheet, a sheet of playing pieces, and a rules booklet.

The first issue includes a critical analysis by Jon Compton of Breaking the Chains (Compass Games, 2014), in which he assesses the insight the game offers into future Sino-American conflict in the South China Sea. Game designer John Gorkowski then offers a rebuttal.

Cover01The issue also contains a very nitpicky, negative review of At Nueve Chapelle (White Dog Games, 2012) by the game’s own graphic artist. There’s a piece on “Wargaming by the Rules of War,” that offers a satirical take on the Red Cross movement’s efforts to have video games more accurately reflect the role of international humanitarian law in modern warfare. (Personally, I didn’t find it that funny or on-target, given what the ICRC and American Red Cross are actually trying to do. However, I’m a bit of an IHL nerd.)

A preview is offered of the forthcoming American Civil War game Huzzah! (One Small Step 2014). Finally, the issue contains a  game (120 counter, 11″x17″ map) of the fighting at the Mule Shoe Salient during the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse (1864) during the American Civil War. This uses also Huzzah’s “Rebel Yell Light” rules. Since I haven’t played it yet, I can’t really comment on the game or rules.

Overall, I thought CounterFact was a worthy initiative, but one with uneven content that is still very much in search of its niche, voice, and identity. I very much like the idea of well-informed debates over game design and game philosophy that draw on both game reviews and informed assessment of historical or future conflict. Despite its title, there is no consistent focus on games as a rigorous method of counterfactual analysis in CounterFact, other than in the very general sense that all historical conflict simulations embody this to a greater or lesser degree.

Big Board Gaming had somewhat similar impressions of the first issue—for that review, see below.

Simulation & Gaming, June 2014

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