PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Category Archives: call for papers

Simulation & gaming miscellany, post-PDW edition

PDW

I recently returned from an extremely productive week spent discussing wargaming and analytical methodologies with colleagues from the Defence and Security Analysis Division of the UK Ministry Defence Defence Science and Technology Laboratory at their Portsdown West site. I’ll post a trip report as soon as my comments and the photos are cleared for public release.

In the meantime, PAXsims is pleased to present some recent items on conflict simulation and serious (and not-so-serious) gaming that may be of interest to our readers. Ryan Kuhns contributed material for this latest edition.

PAXsims

jdn1_16In May, the Pentagon released Joint Doctrine Note 1-16 on the topic of Command Red Team:

Command red teams help commanders and staffs think critically and creatively; challenge assumptions; mitigate groupthink; reduce risks by serving as a check against complacency and surprise; and increase opportunities by helping the staff see situations, problems, and potential solutions from alternative perspectives.

The distinguishing feature of a command red team from alternative analysis produced by subject matter experts within the intelligence directorate of a joint staff is its relative independence, which isolates it from the organizational influences that can unintentionally shape intelligence analysis, such as the human tendency for analysts to maintain amicable relations with colleagues and supervisors, and the potential for regular coordination processes to normalize divergent assessments. Commanders can seek the perspectives of trusted advisors regarding any issue of concern. A command red team may also address similar issues, but unlike most commander’s advisory/action groups, it supports the commander’s staff throughout the design, planning, execution, and assessment of operations, and during routine problem-solving initiatives throughout the headquarters. Red teams and tiger teams may be ad hoc and address specific issues. In many cases, the only difference between the two may be the participation of a red team member who can advise the group in the use of structured techniques. Alternate modes employ red teaming as a temporary or additional duty or as an ad hoc operation, with teams assembled as needed to address specific issues.

JDN 1-16 goes on to address Red Team organization, challenges, and activities, as well as their contribution to joint planning and joint intelligence. The appendices include a list of common logical fallacies and tips for effective devil’s advocacy.

 

PAXsims

Wikistrat-A-Chinese-Spring-cover-464x600Shay Hershkovitz, Chief Strategy Officer and Director of the Analytical Community at Wikistrat, has passed on a recent report on how China might deal with future unrest.

Wikistrat generally uses online expert crowd-sourcing to explore scenarios and identify drivers and pathways. In this case, the simulation methodology was as follows:

50 analysts were handpicked from Wikistrat’s global community of more than 2,000 to participate in this simulation, including renowned China experts Andrew K.P. Leung, Hong Kong’s former chief representative to the United Kingdom; Professor Yawei Liu, Director of the Carter Center’s China Program; and Hugh Stephens, Executive-in-Residence at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada.

The participants were divided into four mirror-image teams (all playing as the Politburo) to test whether they would manage the crisis differently. The game progressed across four rounds, each representing a week of real time. The teams were given the same scenario at the start, but conditions were adjusted in subsequent rounds to re ect the actions of each team.

Every participant could propose an action by submitting a “move” containing a policy decision (e.g., suppress online discussion of the protests), a desired end-state and a rationale. The rest of the team expressed their approval by “liking” the proposal (or disapproval by taking no action). Whichever proposal received the most likes in a given round was interpreted by Wikistrat as the team’s consensus and informed the next round’s update.

119 moves were proposed by the teams in total. There was often a clear preference for one or two moves per round in each team. In only a few cases did Wikistrat need to consolidate various moves that received an equal number of likes.

A fifth group of experts was engaged as a U.S. observer team to offer insights into how the United States might interpret and respond to China’s actions.

In the end, the four China teams proceeded more or less along the same pathways, seeking to quell the protests by cracking down on ringleaders while offering concessions and conjuring up foreign plots in order to demotivate the masses.

You’ll find a description of each round of the simulation and key take-aways in the full report (link above).

ChineseSpring3

PAXsims

A modified version of the digital game Civilization V is being developed for use in high school classrooms. According to The Verge:

 Publisher Take-Two Interactive announced that a modified version of the historical strategy game Civilization V is in the works, and is expected to be available for high school classes in North America starting next fall. Called CivilizationEDU, the company says that the education-focused version of the game will “provide students with the opportunity to think critically and create historical events, consider and evaluate the geographical ramifications of their economic and technological decisions, and to engage in systems thinking and experiment with the causal / correlative relationships between military, technology, political, and socioeconomic development.”

While I enjoy Civ V and other 4X (“eXplore, eXpand, eXploit, and eXterminate”) games, I’m a little doubtful that they are the best way of teaching about world history since they tend to be designed to reflect player preferences, expectations, and preconceptions rather than portray accurate historical dynamics.

PAXsims

…and on that subject, it’s about time we offered a shout-out to Play the Past, a website “dedicated to thoughtfully exploring and discussing the intersection of cultural heritage (very broadly defined) and games/meaningful play (equally broadly defined).”

PAXsims

Brexit.jpg

At the Active Learning in Political Science blog they discuss simulating Brexit:

In the spirit of not wasting a good crisis, the UK’s decision to leave the European Union offers a great way into understanding a number of political dynamics.

Of course, we need to tread a bit carefully here, for a number of reasons. Firstly, this is a highly fluid situation, so whatever one might plan for the autumn might be completely overtaken by events. Secondly, some of the things that have happened over the past week are so extreme and atypical that while you might reproduce them in a simulation setting, you are almost certainly never going to see them happen again. Thirdly, there’s an awful lot going on, so you need to pick your targets clearly.

With all those caveats in mind, some options still present themselves….

PAXsims

460003main_merraflood93.jpgOn 20-21 October 2016, the Digital Culture Unit at Goldsmiths, University of London will be hosting a conference on Simulation and Environments: A Critical Dialogue Between Systems Of Perception And Ecocritical Aesthetics.

Theme #1: Aesthetics and Environmental Simulations

When addressing issues of climate and climate crisis, simulation models and techniques become potent tools for understanding, prediction, and prevention. Yet the epistemological merit of these tools is rarely accompanied with a critical assessment of their aesthetic properties.

Put another way, the history of nature and the environment is, particularly at its interstices with the human and the natural sciences, heavily laden with cultural and even theological ideas about how a nature should look, should make one feel, should be. What guarantee do we have that these ideological preconceptions are not making their way into our simulations and models? If they are being included, how are they influencing our data? Or conversely, should we be including the cultural and affective effects of nature so often associated with the experience of landscape into our computational models precisely because of the way they fold the human into the physical environment?

The aim of this conference stream will be to parse the aesthetic conditions of simulation technologies, assumptions, and ideologies when dealing with the ecosystem. What role can visual or other aesthetics play in the computing of climates and natural phenomena? How does the changing role of the human as geological agent reframe the digital image as an epistemological form?

Proposed essays may touch on one of the following subjects, but are not restricted to including these:

  • Geospatial technologies, imaging, & observational data
  • Earth imaging & observation
  • Computational climate models
  • Military vision and targeting technologies
  • GIS technologies
  • Remote sensing
  • New media art

 

Theme #2: Simulation and Systems of Perception

Conceptions of simulation attempt to recreate the environment through computational logics of representation that only ever remain asymptotic to the physical world. Rather than asking whether or not simulation can ever provide homeomorphic images of the physical how can simulation instead be used performatively to rethink ways of perceiving, knowing and doing?

This might entail a theorisation of vision – or visioning – in the broader sense of not just perceiving with sight, but also insight, as well as the projection of images of elsewheres and otherwises, futures and fantasies. How would such a repositioning affect the potential instrumentalisation of simulation for political imaginaries and art practices?

The aim of this conference stream will be to invite discussion on the ontological and epistemological implications of simulated modes of perception. How can perception be understood in relation to computational aesthetics and logics?

Proposed essays may touch on one of the following subjects, but are not restricted to including these:

  • Computational modelling systems
  • Mathematics and culture
  • Planning technologies and the imaginary
  • Artificial visioning systems
  • Geopositioning and robotics
  • Cognitive simulations

Those interested in participating should  submit paper abstracts of 500 words to environmentalsims@gmail.com by 1 August 2016. (Please designate theme of interest).

33 ISMOR

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The 33rd International Symposium on Military Operational Research will be held 26-29 July 2016 at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Papers and posters are sought on all aspects of the application of analysis to defence and security.  We welcome practice-based papers that explore case studies, demonstrate new techniques, shed light on our most important issues or that bring a multi-disciplinary approach to solving today’s problems (complementing OR with disciplines such as management science, risk, economics and human sciences).

On the Wednesday there will be workshops, a dedicated poster session and tutorials covering techniques, professional practice and case studies.  Posters will be especially welcome from early-career analysts, who are able to attend the symposium at a specially reduced rate.

The call for papers and other further details can be found here, and the registration form is here.

Call for Panelists: Connections wargaming conference panel on “Wargaming: A Crucible for Concepts”

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PAXsims is happy to post this announcement on behalf of Stephen Downes-Martin regarding the forthcoming Connections 2016 interdisciplinary wargaming conference.


This year’s annual  “Connections US” wargaming conference will be held 9-12 August 2016 at Maxwell AFB, AL. Given the Secretary of Defense-level interest at achieving a 3rd Offset Strategy through innovation and the Deputy Secretary of Defense’s personal involvement in catalyzing innovation through reinvigorated wargaming, this year’s Connections will likely be one of our most important. The Connections 2016 theme is advancing Wargaming As A Catalyst For Innovation.

For conference details see the webpage at: https://connections-wargaming.com/

The theme of Panel 1 at this year’s conference is: “Wargaming: A Crucible for Concepts”, and the objective is: “Discuss wargaming techniques that explicitly test to destruction proposed innovative warfighting concepts in order to identify those worth pursuing.”

We invite you to submit a title and abstract to be a panelist on Panel 1 at Connections US 2016!

There will be three panelists, each will speak for twenty minutes, followed by a 30 minute discussion during which the panelists will challenge their own and other panelists ideas in a collegial debate between themselves and the conference participants.

We ask panelists to organize their thoughts and talk around the four questions:

1. What wargame design techniques do we need to determine where or how an idea or concept fails?

2. What are the required player characteristics for wargames that explicitly seek to know where and how an idea or concept fails?

3. How do we generate innovation using wargames that explicitly seek to know where and how an idea or concept fails?

4. How do we know if it is the concept that fails or the wargame design has failed (for example missing input data)?

If you are interested please send your title and abstract to both of us BEFORE FRIDAY JUNE 24 at:

We will select the three panelists that best support the panel by Friday July 1. We ask that the winners provide their PowerPoint presentation—with detailed talking points on the notes page of each slide—to David and Stephen by Friday July 22.

(NOTE: if you are interested in speaking on the other panels, please contact Timothy Wilkie at timothy.wilkie@ndu.edu for further information about those panels)

CFP: Game Studies special issue on “WAR/GAME”

gamestudies

The online journal Game Studies has issued a call for papers for a special Issue on “WAR/GAME,” to be edited by Holger Pötzsch and Phil Hammond:

Video games are an important sector of the global entertainment industry and AAA titles often have budgets and audiences similar to those of major Hollywood productions. Many of the commercially most successful games are war-themed titles that play out in what are framed as authentic real-world settings inspired by historical events. Parallel to this development, significant changes have occurred in the way Western industrialized nations wage actual wars. It has been argued that postmodern war increasingly resembles a videogame and that this form of mediatization fundamentally changes how wars are justified, perceived, experienced, and waged. This, and other postulated connections between war games and actual wars merit critical scholarly attention and scrutiny.

This special issue of Game Studies interrogates the relations between games and war. Particular attention will be directed to digital games, but submissions dealing with board games, tabletop roleplaying games, and others are also welcome. We invite contributions that approach the war/game relationship from various theoretical and methodological vantage points. Interdisciplinary studies fall within the purview of the issue as do articles exploring the field from the point of view of distinct disciplinary traditions. Analysis and criticism of particular games or genres are equally welcome, as are empirical studies of players and player cultures, investigations of the political economy of games and gaming, theoretical inquiries into the socio-cultural roles and functions of games, or studies of the tensions between game forms and re-appropriative practices of play, for example. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The aesthetics of war games
  • Interconnections between the games industry, players, and the military
  • The relation of war games to historical knowledge, beliefs and attitudes
  • The history of war games and war gaming
  • War games and embodiment
  • Critical war game design and serious war games
  • Transgressive dimensions of war games and war gaming
  • The role of games in the mediatization and cultural framing of war
  • War games, minorities, and marginalization

Please consult the Game Studies submission guidelines before submitting your paper—only fully formatted articles will be considered for review. The deadline for submission is 1 December 2015. The issue will be published in December 2016.

h/t Nikola Adamus 

CFP: Temporality in Simulation Gaming

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Timo Lainema (University of Turku) has issued a call for papers for a symposium issue of Simulation & Gaming on “Temporality in Simulation Gaming.”

With this symposium (special issue) of Simulation & Gaming, we call on authors to prepare and contribute original and unpublished articles exploring temporality in simulation gaming. Research on time in gaming is becoming more common, but is still rare. This is surprising considering that the majority of business simulation/games, for example, have a time dimension embedded in their virtual world.

Possible topics of interest (not necessarily limited to these):

  • review of existing literature on simulation gaming time processing and presentation methods, with the most recent developments;
  • the nature of time during a simulation game and how it affects the gaming experience;
  • flow/immersion and time – how they are linked together;
  • what kinds of phenomena can be represented with simulation games that have different ways of dealing with the flow of gaming decisions and tasks;
  • how the time presentation of a simulation game affects the authenticity of the game;
  • problems of condensed and simplified simulation time – does condensation lead to potential problems and misunderstandings ;
  • studies on the relationship between the progression of events within the game internal world time and the progression of real-world time
  • how temporality affects the cognitive processes of the player
  • time in team based games – how temporality affects team processes, communication and collaboration
  • temporal structures for arranging optimal game learning processes: when to motivate, brief, and debrief the game content and outcomes, how the participants change on the temporal continuum during this process (from newcomers to experts in the gaming context)
  • presentation and analysis of simulation games which aim at teaching future-oriented awareness of the players – learning about time, its horizon and future;
  • how various perceptions and notions of time influence the debriefing process.

Unfortunately, I’ve only just seen the CFP, and so the deadline for submission of abstracts is soon—”summer 2015.” For further details, see the link above.

Military Operations Research Society 83rd annual symposium (June 2015)

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The 83rd annual symposium of the Military Operations Research Society will be held in Alexandria, VA on 22-25 June 2015. As usual, there will be a considerable number of panels on wargaming, modelling and simulation, and related topics.

Submission of abstracts opened on 1 December (until 15 March). Symposium registration will open on 7 January. As usual, some sessions will be classified, and either NOFORNed (restricted to US citizens) or open to pre-cleared FVEY participants too.

Further information is available at the MORS website. For a summary of the 82nd symposium, see the following PAXsims reports:

ISAGA / JASAG 2015

ISAGA2015The Japan Association of Simulation and Gaming will host the 46th annual conference of the International Simulation and Gaming Association on 17-21 July 2015 in Kyoto, Japan. The theme of the conference will be “hybridizing simulation and gaming in the network society.”

While the conference website seems incomplete at the moment, you’ll find some additional details here.

International Conference on Exercises, Gaming, and Simulations for Intelligence and National Security

intelconflogoRegistration has opened for the International Conference on Exercises, Gaming, and Simulations for Intelligence and National Security to be held at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. on 24-25 March 2015: 

The goal of this international conference, between the Center for Intelligence Services and Democratic Systems at Rey Juan Carlos University and the School of  Continuing Studies at Georgetown University is to enhance the role of experiential learning methods and techniques showcasing original simulations, exercises, and games applied to national security intelligence, competitive intelligence, and foreign affairs. The conference will bring together ideas, concepts and demonstrations that can further train and educate military, law enforcement and national security professionals.

A sample of conference topics include:

  • Scenario-based approach for developing the links between analysis and reporting
  • Computational Simulation In Intelligence Analysis
  • The Induction Game and Intelligence Education
  • Gaming and Modeling Before a Crisis
  • Use of Gaming and Exercise as Part of an Engagement Strategy
  • Gaming the Nexus between Intelligence and Policy
  • Concrete Tabletop Exercises for Cognitive Skill Development in Analysts
  • Serious gaming & how to create visionary practitioners and policy makers
  • Balancing Realism and Playability in the Intelligence Classroom
  • Structured Analytic Techniques for Cyber Security through Role Playing
  • Cyber-Attack and Ethics Simulations
  • Virtual Training Systems and Survival Humanistic Factors

Further details and online registration can be found at the link above. Any questions should be directed to Dr. Jan Goldman or Dr. Ruben Arcos  Martin  (outside North America).

Unfortunately I won’t be able to attend, since the dates clash with my own annual Brynania civil war simulation. However we hope to have someone there to report on the conference.

CFP: Canadian Game Studies Association annual conference (June 2015)

uottawa3The 2015 Canadian Game Studies Association (CGSA/ACÉV) annual conference will be held on 3-5 June in Ottawa, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Congress will be hosted by the University of Ottawa.

This year’s theme is “Capital Ideas”:

CGSA-logo-340For this year’s CGSA conference we invite proposals for ‘capital ideas’ in all caps or small caps, in bold and in italics, and most importantly in consideration of and for those individuals, groups, communities, and locales that are far from holding or being in possession of ‘capital’. Suggested topics include:

  • Ideology in games and gaming culture
  • Ideals and values in games
  • Riffs on ‘capital’ and games;
  • Social, cultural, political and economic capital and games
  • Intersectional approaches to studying games and their surrounding player cultures
  • Methods and study designs for investigating underexplored games and gaming communities

We invite submissions from all disciplines from researchers working on or around games including digital and non-digital games.   Graduate student submissions are welcome and encouraged!

New for 2015:

CGSA is growing! We have expanded the conference to add a third day to the official Congress schedule.

CGSA has joined EasyChair! All conference submissions should be made through the conference management portal.

Submissions:

This year we will be accepting proposals for three kinds of submissions:

Individual Paper Submissions

Please submit an abstract no longer than 500 words (excluding references).

Panel Submission

In the spirit of this call for papers, we particularly encourage participants to submit proposals for interdisciplinary panels, as well as to consider the possibility of organizing joint sessions with other scholarly associations. CGSA welcomes proposals for joint panels with FSAC and Digital Humanities, and we encourage individual presenters to note if they are open to being scheduled on a joint panel. Submit your pre-constituted panel proposal or individual paper proposal to either association. You and your panellists need to be members of one of these three associations, but not necessarily all.

Please indicate clearly if your panel submission is intended to be a joint session with another scholarly association.

Panel submissions must include a 500-word panel overview and 250 words describing each individual presentation. The panel organizer/chair should assemble all materials and submit as a single submission to Easy Chair. When submitting the panel to EasyChair, the organizer/chair should be listed as corresponding author, and all other panel participants should be listed as co-authors.

Creative Work/Workshops/Other Formats

CGSA welcomes other types of submissions including workshops, gameplay demonstrations, fishbowls, etc. Please contact the 2015 CGSA chairs in advance of the deadline with a brief summary of your proposed submission, anticipated equipment needs, and an estimated length of time requested.

Deadline is January 31, 2015.

 Please submit all proposals here.

The 2015 CGSA co-chairs are Kelly Bergstrom, Felan Parker and Jennifer Jenson.

CFP: 2015 APSA Teaching and Learning Conference

TLC2015

The deadline for submitting paper prooposals to the 2015 American Political Science Association Teaching & Learning Conference is October 20. The conference itself will be held in Washington DC on 16-18 January 2015.

The theme for the 12th Annual APSA Teaching and Learning Conference is, “Innovations and Expectations for Teaching in the Digital Era,” which focuses on the challenges and opportunities of teaching in the digital age when information literacy is a critical skill and we are all “plugged in.” Panels and workshops will present research on pedagogy in the digital age; and, discuss best practices for integrating digital techniques and traditional methods to engage students and train them to think critically, write effectively, and evaluate, consume and generate knowledge of political science successfully.

The paper proposal themes include simulations and role-play:

Simulations and role play exercises help political scientists and students model the decision making processes of real-world political actors. Examples of these teaching techniques and strategies include Model United Nations, Model European Union, in-class self designed simulations, and on-line role playing exercises. Papers in this track will address such topics as: in what way can simulations and role-play expand student learning opportunities in political science? Which formats are most effective? and How do we measure the effectiveness of simulations?

You’ll find the online proposal submission form here.

CFP: ISCRAM 2015 – serious gaming track

ISCRAM2015

The 12th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management (ISCRAM 2015) will be held on 24-27 May 2015 in Kristiansand, Norway. The conference will include a track on serious games:

Experiencing the unexpected is crucial to understanding and being able to handle crisis. Serious Gaming is rapidly gaining credibility in providing professionals with rich and varied experiences that present the reality of crisis management, but in a safe environment that allows them to reflect and gradually improve. Serious games can range from single player, standalone computer games aimed at informing or educating citizens to extensive, multiplayer virtual exercises for the training of professionals.

The aims of this track are to explore how serious games contribute to crisis management and to offer a platform for researchers and practitioners to exchange state of-the art knowledge on serious games for crisis management as well as discuss future challenges and opportunities. The type of submissions that we are looking for can serve any of these purposes including the use of serious games for training, for creating awareness and for research. The track also aims to explore possibilities of the upcoming notion of gamification in crisis management, i.e. applying game mechanics to non-game applications. Such game elements provide alternative ways to guide, motivate, and engage people – citizens and professionals – in tasks, and therefore have the potential to increase the effectiveness of crisis management.

Track topics

The theme for this track is “experiencing the unexpected”, because of the power of serious games to induce practical learning in a safe but realistic environment.

  • Serious Gaming (SG) for crisis preparation – including community awareness
  • Virtual environments for crisis and emergency response training
  • Strategy gaming for complex decision making during crisis
  • Serious gaming for inter-organizational coordination during crisis
  • Crisis communication: Serious gaming that trains users to transfer information and instructions (earthquake or flood risks) to different audiences
  • Crowd sourcing games, which involve the larger public in data analysis and solution generation during crisis
  • Gaming Analysis for measuring disaster response aspects
  • Serious games to develop and evaluate disaster recovery plans

You will find further information and contact details in the full call for papers.

h/t Anja van der Hulst 

CFP: The military and the cultural influences of role-playing games

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A call for papers—or, more accurately, a call for a specific paper—has been issued in connection with a planned edited volume on the cultural impact of role-playing games:

Since its initial publication in 1974, the iconic role-playing game (RPG) Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) has spawned hundreds of other analog and digital RPGs, as well as an entirely new industry and subculture. In the last decade, scholars from across the disciplinary spectrum have explored the origins, characteristics, cultures, and player experiences of RPGs. Yet, little scholarly attention has been devoted to the meaningful ways RPGs have shaped and transformed society at large over the past forty years.

The majority of the chapters for the collection have already been selected, but we would like to include an additional chapter on the use of role-playing games (tabletop, live-action, etc.), or similar games or gaming-related activities used by the U.S. or another military organization for training, operational concept development, or any other purpose.

Please send proposed abstracts of 250-500 words, along with a brief (250 word) biography and C.V., in either *.rtf (rich text format) or *.doc (MS Word document format), to editors Andrew Byers and Francesco Crocco at rpgbook2014@gmail.com by August 15, 2014. If accepted for the collection, completed essays of 7,000 to 10,000 words will be due by January 1, 2015.

Source: cfp.english.upenn.edu

Simulation & Gaming, April 2014

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 45, 2 (April 2014) is now available.

Articles
Christle Grace G. Carabeo, Charisse May M. Dalida, Erica Marla Z. Padilla, and Ma. Mercedes T. Rodrigo
Timothy C. Clapper
Ki-Young Jeong and Ipek Bozkurt
Alice Y. Kolb, David A. Kolb, Angela Passarelli, and Garima Sharma
Jonna Koponen, Eeva Pyörälä, and Pekka Isotalus
Kimmo Oksanen and Raija Hämäläinen
Call for Papers

The call for papers that forms part of the issue is on the topic of “theory to practice in simulation.”

Call for Papers

Theory to Practice in Simulation

Symposium issue of Simulation & Gaming: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Theory, Practice and Research.

Guest Editors: Timothy C. Clapper, PhD, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, TC Curriculum & Instructional Design, LLC, USA and Iris G. Cornell, PhD, RN, Rasmussen College, USA Email: timothy.clapper@gmail.com

With this special issue of Simulation & Gaming, we call on authors to prepare and contribute original and unpublished articles exploring specific learning theories that guide best practices in simulation. Theory guides practice and practice guides theory. Practice theory is descriptive and we have a need to describe the use of the learning theories that support best-practices in active, engaging, and informative simulation-based instruction.

We will use a Conceptual paper design and a structured abstract. For this special issue, we prefer articles to be short communications (1500-2500 words) of one or two specific learning theories applicable to appropriate instructional design and simulation-based instruction.

Process: Before submitting a manuscript, please consult the Guide for S&G Authors http://www.unice.fr/sg/authors/ and the detailed call for papers available on the S&G web site and (LINK). The first step involves sending an abstract and keywords to the guest editors. After the approval of your abstract by the guest editors, you will be invited to submit your full manuscript. Only those articles of the highest quality will move forward for publication.

Schedule

  • Receipt of proposals: summer, 2014.
  • Response to proposals: within in a month.
  •  Submission of manuscripts: fall, 2014
  • First review: to be submitted by end of fall 2014.
  • Revision (maybe 2nd review), editing, proofing, in a month • Online publication: as articles are accepted.
  • Publication of special issue: possibly early/mid 2015

More details at: http://www.unice.fr/sg/resources/cfp_Theory-practice_long_Clapper.pdf

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Connections Australia 2014

It is now confirmed—Australia will be getting its own version of the Connections interdisciplinary wargaming conference, to be held at the University of Melbourne on 8-9 December 2014:

Australia-flagConnections Australia

Due to the success of the Connections conference last year in the UK and the many successful years of the US original, we have decided to run a similar conference/ workshop here in Australia.

It will be held in the Interaction Design Lab at the University of Melbourne 8-9 December 2014.

We are seeking expressions of interest from potential attendees, particularly anyone with something to present. The format will be four 90 minute sessions per day with 2-3 speakers and time for open discussion on each topic. We would like to have a broad range of participants from the military, emergency management, law enforcement, business and academia.

Anyone interested in attending is asked to contact Todd Mason or Mariana Zafeirakopoulos with a proposal.

 

Program

Monday 8 December

0900-1030 Introduction to wargaming
1030-1100 Break
1100-1230 Wargaming for Intelligence Analysis
1230-1330 Lunch
1330-1500 Wargaming in the Australian Army (TBC)
1500-1530 Break
1530-1700 TBC

Tuesday 9 December

0900-1030 TBC
1030-1100 Break
1100-1230 TBC
1230-1330 Lunch
1330-1500 TBC
1500-1530 Break
1530-1700 Wrap Up

 

Costs

There will be no cost for conference attendance, however a gold coin donation to cover tea & coffee would be appreciated. No meals will be provided (other than coffee, tea and biscuits etc.)

There are many cafes around the University campus and in nearby Carlton for lunch.

A conference dinner will be held on the Monday evening (details to be confirmed).

CFP: International Conference on Exercises, Gaming, and Simulations for Intelligence and National Security

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A call for papers has been issued for an international conference on “exercises, gaming, and simulations for intelligence and national security,” to be held at Georgetown University (Washington DC) on 24-25 March 2015:

International Conference on Exercises, Gaming, and Simulations for Intelligence and National Security

Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.

March 24-25, 2015

Scholars, industry experts, intelligence and national security practitioners are invited to submit papers or proposals for demonstrations for the International Conference on Exercises, Gaming, and Simulations for Intelligence and National Security. The goal of the conference is to enhance the role of experiential learning methodologies at all levels of intelligence education by showcasing original simulations, exercises, and games applied to national intelligence, competitive intelligence, national security, and foreign affairs. The conference is to bring together ideas, concepts and demonstrations that can further training and education for military, law enforcement and national security professionals.

Proposed Conference topics include:

  • Role-playing simulations to enhance intelligence analysis and production
  • Simulations dealing with intelligence professionalization
  • Experiential learning methodologies in intelligence analysis
  • Intelligence tradecraft gamification
  • Storytelling techniques for developing intelligence scenarios
  • Interactive education and training for addressing national security threats
  • Experiential Learning for Business/Competitive Intelligence
  • Educating intelligence clients and consumers
  • Role-playing for effective debriefing
  • Immersive learning and multimedia communications
  • Effective combinations of case studies, simulation & gaming in intelligence and national security curricula
  • Virtual simulations

51hT0+MXdXL._SL500_AA300_The conference is a follow-on event to the recent released, The Art of Intelligence: Simulations, Exercises, and Games (Roman and Littlefield, 2014).

Proposals or abstracts are to be submitted no later than September 1, 2014 

OR  for further information, contact any of the following:

  • Dr. William Lahneman,  Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (william.lahneman@erau.edu)
  • Dr. Jan Goldman, Georgetown University (jg28@georgetown.edu)
  • Dr. Rubén Arcos, Rey Juan Carlos University, Madrid, Spain (ruben.arcos@urjc.es)

The Art of Intelligence has been previously reviewed on PAXsims.

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