PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Category Archives: call for papers

Connections Netherlands 2020

The Connections NL professional wargaming conference will will take place on 7 December 2020. Part of it may be streamed. This year’s conference is focused on the defence wargaming community.

For further details as they are announced, consult the Connections Netherlands website.

Connections NL is a cosponsor of the Derby House Principles and diversity and inclusion in wargaming.

CFP: The history, state and future of professional and public (war)gaming in Europe

Riccardo Masini, Frédéric Serval, Jan Heinemann have issued a call for articles for a edited book project on The history, state and future of professional and public (war)gaming in Europe.

The perception of wargaming as a professional part of military training and scenario analysis on one hand, and the board and tabletop wargaming hobby on the other hand, are dominated by US-American approaches and communities of players and designers. Despite being crammed in a relatively small part of the world, European wargaming spheres and communities seem to have stayed somewhat isolated on a national basis due to language barriers and other reasons and little is known about the state of the profession and hobby from country to country.

This volume aims for closing this gap and provide a comprehensive overview of the history of the multiple dimensions of wargaming all over Europe. Thus, we want to encourage contribution of articles focussed on the history of wargaming (military conflict simulations, as well as hobby board, miniature tabletop and role playing games), the perception of wargaming as part of the national, trans-, and international gaming culture(s), the relations of wargaming and eurogaming in regard to perception, gaming communities, inter-European exchange, as well as to the history and future of approaches to wargame design.

You will find additional details, submission, and guidelines here.

Ludogogy

The following item was written by Sarah Le-Fevre, editor of Ludogogy.


Ludogogy is a monthly online magazine that looks at theory and practice in games-based learning, gamification, and gameful and playful design in general.  Our writers and readers are the same people, and we welcome submissions from anyone who has an interest in the magazine’s topic area, as a creator or consumer. Ludogogy aspires to open a conversation between those who design and make playful experiences and those who utilise them to effect change, personally or in their organisations. The magazine offers inspiration, practical how-tos and exposure to new ideas, helping our readers to create and achieve value from gameful design and delivery.

We publish work from recognised experts in the field, but equally welcome submissions from those early in their careers, or from those who simply want to find out more. Ludogogy is definitely a magazine and not a journal, so although we do publish writing from academics, please aim more for a style that is accessible to the general reader.

Currently we do not offer payment for submissions, but this may change in the future. Contributors may however promote their own work or products, so long as this does not occur within the article itself. For details see ‘Promotion’ below.

The editor reserves the right to make changes to submissions before publication, but will share the amended copy with authors for approval before publishing.

Acceptable content

We can accept:

  1. Text articles with images (between 300 -2000 words)
  2. Video files (less than 10 minutes in length)
  3. Audio files (less than 10 minutes in length)
  4. PDFs for items such as downloadable game materials

We accept pitches and drafts for articles.  Video and audio files can be submitted to be embedded in the magazine site (preferred), or via a link to YouTube etc.

Promotion

Although content needs to be kept promotion-free, you have two places where you can talk about yourself and your work.

  • Author Bio: at the end of each article there is space for a short bio. Please note, that unless you indicate otherwise, your by-line will be your name. You may include any or all of the following for inclusion
    • Author photo – portrait 3:4 aspect ratio e.g 300px x 400px
    • Details of qualifications
    • Brief details of current employment (and up to two previous)
    • Brief details of current business (and up to two previous)
    • Achievements e.g awards
  • Contributors page:  A longer piece where you can include details of and links to your work and products and services. You may include any or all of the following for inclusion
    • Company logo
    • Text – up to 250 words containing….
    • Links to products, services, projects or similar you want to promote
    • One testimonial quote or similar

Both pitches and completed articles can be sent to info@ludogogy.co.uk.

Please note that this is a short summary of the submission guidelines and you should read those carefully as the contain important details about formats, inclusion of images and so on.

The following are upcoming themes for which we are currently accepting submissions, along with some suggestions for article ideas:

  • Issue 7 (September) ‘For the Players’ – deadline 23 Aug – Inspiration gained as a player / how it informs practice etc. You might want to look at how you have used a particular mechanic from a favourite commercial game, the game that made you want to be a designer, your first experience of a serious game etc.
  • Issue 8 (October) ‘The Wargames Issue’ – deadline 27 Sep – In the broadest sense, how wargames (or their design principles) can be used both for defense applications, and for civilian / business applications too.
  • Issue 9 (November) ‘Systems Thinking’ – deadline 25 October – How can games be used for systems learning? In what ways can games be seen, and designed, as systems? What does systems thinking bring to the practice of learning, and games, design? etc.
  • Issue 10 (December) ‘Futurism’ – deadline 22 November – Designing games to look to the future? What does the future of games-based learning hold? How can games help us to practise foresight? etc.
  • Issue 11 (January) ‘Changes’ – deadline 20 December – How can games help to drive behaviour change? The ethics of using gamification to influence the actions of others? Games used for self-help or self-improvement? etc.

Connections US 2020 Wargaming Conference – Call for Presentations

Connections 2020 will be hosted by the Wargaming Division of the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory in Quantico, VA, August 4-7.

Connections is an interdisciplinary wargaming conference that has been held annually since 1993, with the mission of advancing and preserving the art, science, and application of wargaming. Connections participants come from all elements of the wargaming discipline, and include those in the military, government, academic, private sector, and commercial hobbyist fields. By providing a forum for practitioners to share insights and best practices, Connections works to improve gaming as a tool for research, analysis, education, and policy.

Presentations on any aspect of professional wargaming are welcome. The 2020 conference theme is Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Wargaming, and with that in mind, presentations on applying current and emerging AI/ML capabilities to increase the value of wargaming (or using wargaming to better understand the implications of advances in AI/ML) are especially encouraged.

However, any presentations related to wargaming will receive full consideration. The Connections agenda is a mix of content related to the year’s theme and other topics of interest to wargaming practitioners.

Please submit your proposal via the Google Form at the following link (which contains additional information): https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdQtpt0K5bTg-hn4655vzyBmS9k5BQZkW0aVjcbQkiCQGa0gw/viewform

It is by no means necessary to have attended a previous Connections conference to participate as a speaker. More information about past Connections events and current updates on the status of planning for Connections 2020 can be found at the conference website: https://connections-wargaming.com/

For additional information or any questions or concerns, please contact Timothy Wilkie at timothy.wilkie@ndu.edu

CFP: NATO 13th Operations Research and Analysis Conference

 

The NATO 13th Operations Research and Analysis Conference will be held in Ottawa on 7-8 October 2019. The conference is cosponsored by Supreme Allied Commander Transformation and the Science and Technology Organization, and is open to all NATO nations, STO Enhanced Opportunity Partners (Australia, Finland and Sweden) and Partnership for Peace nations.

The 2019 theme is “Challenges for NATO OR&A in a Changing Global Security Environment”. The conference will kick off with a number of keynote addresses and proceed through various streams. The Programme Committee welcomes papers that address the conference theme from different perspectives. Papers describing emerging techniques and approaches as well as case studies of analysis undertaken are equally welcome. Based on the submission of abstracts, the PC will group papers for the conduct of running parallel sessions.

The organizers have issued a call for papers.  Potential presenters are asked to submit an abstract by June 1. To have the widest distribution possible, they ask that presented material should preferably be unclassified.

 

CONNECTIONS NORTH 2019

https---cdn.evbuc.com-images-52648159-589940880-1-original.jpg

Registration is now open for the CONNECTIONS NORTH interdisciplinary wargaming conference, to be held at McGill University in Montréal on Saturday, 16 February 2019. The conference is intended for national security professionals, academics and educators, humanitarian and development workers, diplomats,  community activists, game designers, and others interested in conflict simulation and serious gaming.

The programme for the conference is available here.

Further details on CONNECTIONS NORTH are available at the link above. The conference Facebook page can be found here. The following day (February 17) we will also be holding the annual McGill megagame, APOCALYPSE NORTH.

For details of the 2018 CONNECTIONS NORTH conference, see the report at PAXsims.

 

2019 International Teaching and Learning Conference

#PSAT&L19 Final_3.png

The 2019 International Teaching and Learning Conference will take place on 17-19 June 2019 in Brighton, UK. The conference sponsored by the Political Science Association, the the British International Studies Association, the European Consortium for Political Research, and the American Political Science Association. The theme of the conference is teaching politics in an era of populism.

This conference aims to provide a forum in which political science educators from different countries and contexts can come together to explore these challenges and share their experiences and teaching practices. We welcome contributions which explore the challenges faced in national, international, or comparative contexts. We also welcome different approaches to understanding populism and the challenges that it may present to political science educators in different contexts.

The rise of populism across North America and Europe in recent decades presents a range of challenges to the teaching of political science and international relations in the universities and colleges. At one level, our curriculum must develop to cover new forms of political activity, the rise of new parties and movements, and new forms of political and government behaviour. But the challenges go beyond simply the content of what we teach. In a political culture in which expertise and established standards of evidence are devalued, political science educators can find themselves portrayed as mere peddlers of opinion and ideology. A range of questions arise, including:

  • Can or should political science education be ‘politically neutral’? Should we nurture values of democracy, equality, and citizenship and, if so, how?
  • How can we support students in developing knowledge, understanding and skills relating to the complex nature of politics, society and government? What role might different approaches to teaching such as simulations, civic engagement and other pedagogies play?
  • What are the challenges of constructing a curriculum and developing learning resources in a period of rapid and sometime dramatic political change?
  • How can we collaborate across different national and educational contexts to support critical learning in political science and international relations? What best practices are there for collaboration in both pedagogical research and cross-cultural classroom experiences?
  • Are there practices or pedagogies from other disciplines that can be adopted or adapted to address these issues?

Guide for Authors/Presenters/Panel Convenors

We welcome proposals for the following categories:

  • Papers. Individual papers reporting research findings, providing a critical account of practice, or assessing the current state of teaching and learning in the field.
  • Panels. Panel submissions should consist of four to five papers relating to a coherent theme. We particularly welcome panels that take cross-national perspectives.
  • Interactive workshops. Proposals to run sessions that provide participants with a structured opportunity to explore a challenging area of political science education in a collaborative session.
  • Short talks. We invite proposals for short 10 minute talks in the style of TED Talks, that present a concise summary of an argument or an idea related to the conference theme.
  • Roundtables. We invite proposals from individuals who would be interested in participating in a roundtable discussion on one of the conference themes.
  • Open stream. To encourage innovative approaches to developing learning, the open stream invites any proposal for an activity that is designed to facilitate critical inquiry addressing the conference theme.

All proposals for panels or workshops should give consideration to gender balance and the promotion of equality and diversity. The standard time for panels and workshops will be 90 minutes.

The deadline for paper and other conference proposals is November 19. You’ll find full submission and registration details at the link above.

Connections 2019 wargaming conference — Call for presentations

AHEC-524.jpg

Connections 2019 will be hosted by the U.S. Army War College at the Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, PA, 13-16 August 2019.

Connections is an interdisciplinary wargaming conference that has been held annually since 1993, with the mission of advancing and preserving the art, science, and application of wargaming.  Connections participants come from all elements of the wargaming discipline, and include those in the military, government, academic, private sector, and commercial hobbyist fields.  By providing a forum for practitioners to share insights and best practices, Connections works to improve gaming as a tool for research, analysis, education, and policy.

Presentations on any aspect of professional wargaming are welcome.  The 2019 conference theme is Futures of Wargaming, and with that in mind, presentations on wargaming future events, advances in wargaming techniques, wargaming to train future leaders, and related topics are especially encouraged.

Please submit your proposal via the Google Form at this link (which contains additional information).

It is by no means necessary to have attended a previous Connections conference to participate as a speaker.  More information about past Connections events and current updates on the status of planning for Connections 2019 can be found at the conference website: https://connections-wargaming.com/

Feel free to pass this along to those who you think might be interested, including posting this in appropriate places online.  For additional information or any questions or concerns, please contact Tim Wilkie (National Defense University).

87th annual MORS symposium

87thSymposium.Header.2019.Final636747772098088248.jpg

The 87th annual symposium of the Military Operations Research Society will be held at the  US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO from 17-20 June 2019:

This year’s theme, “Advancing Analytics to Support National Security,” emphasizes the Society’s goal of leading the national security analysis community in the development of cutting-edge tools, techniques, and best practices. The 87th Symposium will include hundreds of presentations across 7 Composite Groups, 34 Working Groups, and numerous Distributed Working Groups, Focus Sessions, Special Sessions, Demonstrations, Tutorials, and Continuing Education Unit Courses over the four-day program.  Sessions will be conducted at the classified and unclassified level.

New Working Group: Data Science and Analytics, being led by Mr. Ian Kloo of the U.S. Military Academy.  This working group will pave the way in this very active field of research and applications.

Abstracts are now being accepted through 15 February 2019.

For further information, to submit an abstract, or to register, visit the MORS website.

 

“In-Stride Game Adjudication” Session at Connections US 2018

Invitation to participate as an expert panelist

Many multiplayer events require adjudication to be performed simultaneously with play over a period of hours or days. This session will focus on the unique challenges for success in such events. After a introduction of the topic, each participant will spend 10 minutes outlining a specific challenge/problem of their choice experienced in such events, offer approaches to how to solve these challenges and highlight the advantages/disadvantages of each approach based on logic and experience. Following the speakers we will engage in an open discussion between the speakers and the floor.

an-army-lines-up-for-battle-paul-noth.jpgEach participant will commit to providing a white paper (minimum three page text, not PowerPoint, but as long as you like) describing the challenges they are addressing, their proposed approach, the logic and experience that leads them to believe their approach might work, and the disadvantages of their approach BEFORE the conference. They may downselect to a specific challenge when speaking at the panel. They will also assist in producing the product from the session — a stand-alone report containing the panelists pre-delivered white papers, a bibliography on the topic, and notes generated from the session. Ownership and rights to sections of the product will belong to the relevent authors. Your white paper can be a previously published (relevent!) piece so long as you provide permission to include it in our report.

The objectives of the session are to start a research conversation on the topic, identify people working the topic, and create a written document for promulgation to the wargaming community.

Examples of topics could include the following when doing in-stride adjudication:

  • How to provide timely adjudication
  • Rigid versus Free adjudication
  • Inductive versus Deductive adjudication
  • Dealing with aberrant player behavior
  • Dealing with observed player agendas
  • Recovering from adjudication errors
  • Whatever else you can think of …

(1) If you are interested in being on the panel please email both of us as soon as possible along with a very brief outline of your paper and presentation for us to review.

(2) If you would like to submit a white paper for inclusion in the session report but do not want to speak, please send that to both of us.

(3) Everyone, please email both us us with your suggested items for a bibliography of the topic.

We have seats for 8 panelists.

Many thanks for your considerstion

Merle Robinson, murno.robinson@gmail.com

Stephen Downes-Martin, stephen.downesmartin@gmail.com

Call for Papers: Connections 2018 wargaming conference

Connections 2018 will be held at National Defense University in Washington, DC, July 17-20.

8622978636_1612735a07_o.jpg
Connections is an interdisciplinary wargaming conference that has been held annually since 1993, with the mission of advancing and preserving the art, science, and application of wargaming. Connections participants come from all elements of the wargaming discipline, and include those in the military, government, academic, private sector, and commercial hobbyist fields.  By providing a forum for practitioners to share insights and best practices, Connections works to improve gaming as a tool for research, analysis, education, and policy.

Presentations on any aspect of professional wargaming are welcome.  This year, the Connections conference returns to National Defense University, and as a result, any presentations related to the use of gaming for adult education are especially encouraged.

Please submit your proposal via the Google Form at this link (which contains additional information).

It is by no means necessary to have attended a previous Connections conference to participate as a speaker.  More information about past Connections events and current updates on the status of planning for Connections 2018 can be found at the conference website.

Feel free to pass this along to those who you think might be interested, including posting this in appropriate places online.  For additional information or any questions or concerns, please contact me at timothy.wilkie@ndu.edu.

Timothy Wilkie
Research Fellow
Center for Applied Strategic Learning (CASL)
National Defense University

Call for Participants: MORS Wargame Adjudication Working Group 17-20 October 2016

Logo

Working Group 3 (“Adjudication”) at the MORS Wargaming Special Meeting (17-20 October 2016) is seeking participants!

For details of the special meeting and the registration page, see here.

Working Group 3 will address the questions “what are the barriers to doing the best possible job of adjudicating wargames?” and “how can we best overcome those barriers?” using a disciplined group methodology known as “Language Processing”™ in two sessions. Working Group Participants are expected to be competent and experienced wargame adjudicators. The Working Group will produce two linked products corresponding to the two questions in a format similar to a mind-map.

If you are interested and an experienced wargame adjudicator please contact the two Working Group Chairs, Timothy Wilkie and Stephen Downes-Martin, to discuss your participation as soon as possible, but before Friday 30 September at the latest. Thanks!

Stephen Downes-Martin

Simulation & gaming miscellany, post-PDW edition

PDW

I recently returned from an extremely productive week spent discussing wargaming and analytical methodologies with colleagues from the Defence and Security Analysis Division of the UK Ministry Defence Defence Science and Technology Laboratory at their Portsdown West site. I’ll post a trip report as soon as my comments and the photos are cleared for public release.

In the meantime, PAXsims is pleased to present some recent items on conflict simulation and serious (and not-so-serious) gaming that may be of interest to our readers. Ryan Kuhns contributed material for this latest edition.

PAXsims

jdn1_16In May, the Pentagon released Joint Doctrine Note 1-16 on the topic of Command Red Team:

Command red teams help commanders and staffs think critically and creatively; challenge assumptions; mitigate groupthink; reduce risks by serving as a check against complacency and surprise; and increase opportunities by helping the staff see situations, problems, and potential solutions from alternative perspectives.

The distinguishing feature of a command red team from alternative analysis produced by subject matter experts within the intelligence directorate of a joint staff is its relative independence, which isolates it from the organizational influences that can unintentionally shape intelligence analysis, such as the human tendency for analysts to maintain amicable relations with colleagues and supervisors, and the potential for regular coordination processes to normalize divergent assessments. Commanders can seek the perspectives of trusted advisors regarding any issue of concern. A command red team may also address similar issues, but unlike most commander’s advisory/action groups, it supports the commander’s staff throughout the design, planning, execution, and assessment of operations, and during routine problem-solving initiatives throughout the headquarters. Red teams and tiger teams may be ad hoc and address specific issues. In many cases, the only difference between the two may be the participation of a red team member who can advise the group in the use of structured techniques. Alternate modes employ red teaming as a temporary or additional duty or as an ad hoc operation, with teams assembled as needed to address specific issues.

JDN 1-16 goes on to address Red Team organization, challenges, and activities, as well as their contribution to joint planning and joint intelligence. The appendices include a list of common logical fallacies and tips for effective devil’s advocacy.

 

PAXsims

Wikistrat-A-Chinese-Spring-cover-464x600Shay Hershkovitz, Chief Strategy Officer and Director of the Analytical Community at Wikistrat, has passed on a recent report on how China might deal with future unrest.

Wikistrat generally uses online expert crowd-sourcing to explore scenarios and identify drivers and pathways. In this case, the simulation methodology was as follows:

50 analysts were handpicked from Wikistrat’s global community of more than 2,000 to participate in this simulation, including renowned China experts Andrew K.P. Leung, Hong Kong’s former chief representative to the United Kingdom; Professor Yawei Liu, Director of the Carter Center’s China Program; and Hugh Stephens, Executive-in-Residence at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada.

The participants were divided into four mirror-image teams (all playing as the Politburo) to test whether they would manage the crisis differently. The game progressed across four rounds, each representing a week of real time. The teams were given the same scenario at the start, but conditions were adjusted in subsequent rounds to re ect the actions of each team.

Every participant could propose an action by submitting a “move” containing a policy decision (e.g., suppress online discussion of the protests), a desired end-state and a rationale. The rest of the team expressed their approval by “liking” the proposal (or disapproval by taking no action). Whichever proposal received the most likes in a given round was interpreted by Wikistrat as the team’s consensus and informed the next round’s update.

119 moves were proposed by the teams in total. There was often a clear preference for one or two moves per round in each team. In only a few cases did Wikistrat need to consolidate various moves that received an equal number of likes.

A fifth group of experts was engaged as a U.S. observer team to offer insights into how the United States might interpret and respond to China’s actions.

In the end, the four China teams proceeded more or less along the same pathways, seeking to quell the protests by cracking down on ringleaders while offering concessions and conjuring up foreign plots in order to demotivate the masses.

You’ll find a description of each round of the simulation and key take-aways in the full report (link above).

ChineseSpring3

PAXsims

A modified version of the digital game Civilization V is being developed for use in high school classrooms. According to The Verge:

 Publisher Take-Two Interactive announced that a modified version of the historical strategy game Civilization V is in the works, and is expected to be available for high school classes in North America starting next fall. Called CivilizationEDU, the company says that the education-focused version of the game will “provide students with the opportunity to think critically and create historical events, consider and evaluate the geographical ramifications of their economic and technological decisions, and to engage in systems thinking and experiment with the causal / correlative relationships between military, technology, political, and socioeconomic development.”

While I enjoy Civ V and other 4X (“eXplore, eXpand, eXploit, and eXterminate”) games, I’m a little doubtful that they are the best way of teaching about world history since they tend to be designed to reflect player preferences, expectations, and preconceptions rather than portray accurate historical dynamics.

PAXsims

…and on that subject, it’s about time we offered a shout-out to Play the Past, a website “dedicated to thoughtfully exploring and discussing the intersection of cultural heritage (very broadly defined) and games/meaningful play (equally broadly defined).”

PAXsims

Brexit.jpg

At the Active Learning in Political Science blog they discuss simulating Brexit:

In the spirit of not wasting a good crisis, the UK’s decision to leave the European Union offers a great way into understanding a number of political dynamics.

Of course, we need to tread a bit carefully here, for a number of reasons. Firstly, this is a highly fluid situation, so whatever one might plan for the autumn might be completely overtaken by events. Secondly, some of the things that have happened over the past week are so extreme and atypical that while you might reproduce them in a simulation setting, you are almost certainly never going to see them happen again. Thirdly, there’s an awful lot going on, so you need to pick your targets clearly.

With all those caveats in mind, some options still present themselves….

PAXsims

460003main_merraflood93.jpgOn 20-21 October 2016, the Digital Culture Unit at Goldsmiths, University of London will be hosting a conference on Simulation and Environments: A Critical Dialogue Between Systems Of Perception And Ecocritical Aesthetics.

Theme #1: Aesthetics and Environmental Simulations

When addressing issues of climate and climate crisis, simulation models and techniques become potent tools for understanding, prediction, and prevention. Yet the epistemological merit of these tools is rarely accompanied with a critical assessment of their aesthetic properties.

Put another way, the history of nature and the environment is, particularly at its interstices with the human and the natural sciences, heavily laden with cultural and even theological ideas about how a nature should look, should make one feel, should be. What guarantee do we have that these ideological preconceptions are not making their way into our simulations and models? If they are being included, how are they influencing our data? Or conversely, should we be including the cultural and affective effects of nature so often associated with the experience of landscape into our computational models precisely because of the way they fold the human into the physical environment?

The aim of this conference stream will be to parse the aesthetic conditions of simulation technologies, assumptions, and ideologies when dealing with the ecosystem. What role can visual or other aesthetics play in the computing of climates and natural phenomena? How does the changing role of the human as geological agent reframe the digital image as an epistemological form?

Proposed essays may touch on one of the following subjects, but are not restricted to including these:

  • Geospatial technologies, imaging, & observational data
  • Earth imaging & observation
  • Computational climate models
  • Military vision and targeting technologies
  • GIS technologies
  • Remote sensing
  • New media art

 

Theme #2: Simulation and Systems of Perception

Conceptions of simulation attempt to recreate the environment through computational logics of representation that only ever remain asymptotic to the physical world. Rather than asking whether or not simulation can ever provide homeomorphic images of the physical how can simulation instead be used performatively to rethink ways of perceiving, knowing and doing?

This might entail a theorisation of vision – or visioning – in the broader sense of not just perceiving with sight, but also insight, as well as the projection of images of elsewheres and otherwises, futures and fantasies. How would such a repositioning affect the potential instrumentalisation of simulation for political imaginaries and art practices?

The aim of this conference stream will be to invite discussion on the ontological and epistemological implications of simulated modes of perception. How can perception be understood in relation to computational aesthetics and logics?

Proposed essays may touch on one of the following subjects, but are not restricted to including these:

  • Computational modelling systems
  • Mathematics and culture
  • Planning technologies and the imaginary
  • Artificial visioning systems
  • Geopositioning and robotics
  • Cognitive simulations

Those interested in participating should  submit paper abstracts of 500 words to environmentalsims@gmail.com by 1 August 2016. (Please designate theme of interest).

33 ISMOR

RHUL.jpg

The 33rd International Symposium on Military Operational Research will be held 26-29 July 2016 at Royal Holloway, University of London.

Papers and posters are sought on all aspects of the application of analysis to defence and security.  We welcome practice-based papers that explore case studies, demonstrate new techniques, shed light on our most important issues or that bring a multi-disciplinary approach to solving today’s problems (complementing OR with disciplines such as management science, risk, economics and human sciences).

On the Wednesday there will be workshops, a dedicated poster session and tutorials covering techniques, professional practice and case studies.  Posters will be especially welcome from early-career analysts, who are able to attend the symposium at a specially reduced rate.

The call for papers and other further details can be found here, and the registration form is here.

Call for Panelists: Connections wargaming conference panel on “Wargaming: A Crucible for Concepts”

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAP6AAAAJDUzNmExMjA3LTU5NzQtNDgyNi1hZDFlLWNmYjVkMDk1ZWE1Yw.png
PAXsims is happy to post this announcement on behalf of Stephen Downes-Martin regarding the forthcoming Connections 2016 interdisciplinary wargaming conference.


This year’s annual  “Connections US” wargaming conference will be held 9-12 August 2016 at Maxwell AFB, AL. Given the Secretary of Defense-level interest at achieving a 3rd Offset Strategy through innovation and the Deputy Secretary of Defense’s personal involvement in catalyzing innovation through reinvigorated wargaming, this year’s Connections will likely be one of our most important. The Connections 2016 theme is advancing Wargaming As A Catalyst For Innovation.

For conference details see the webpage at: https://connections-wargaming.com/

The theme of Panel 1 at this year’s conference is: “Wargaming: A Crucible for Concepts”, and the objective is: “Discuss wargaming techniques that explicitly test to destruction proposed innovative warfighting concepts in order to identify those worth pursuing.”

We invite you to submit a title and abstract to be a panelist on Panel 1 at Connections US 2016!

There will be three panelists, each will speak for twenty minutes, followed by a 30 minute discussion during which the panelists will challenge their own and other panelists ideas in a collegial debate between themselves and the conference participants.

We ask panelists to organize their thoughts and talk around the four questions:

1. What wargame design techniques do we need to determine where or how an idea or concept fails?

2. What are the required player characteristics for wargames that explicitly seek to know where and how an idea or concept fails?

3. How do we generate innovation using wargames that explicitly seek to know where and how an idea or concept fails?

4. How do we know if it is the concept that fails or the wargame design has failed (for example missing input data)?

If you are interested please send your title and abstract to both of us BEFORE FRIDAY JUNE 24 at:

We will select the three panelists that best support the panel by Friday July 1. We ask that the winners provide their PowerPoint presentation—with detailed talking points on the notes page of each slide—to David and Stephen by Friday July 22.

(NOTE: if you are interested in speaking on the other panels, please contact Timothy Wilkie at timothy.wilkie@ndu.edu for further information about those panels)
%d bloggers like this: