PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Monthly Archives: June 2022

CNAS: Dangerous Straits

A new CNAS report by Stacie Pettyjohn, Becca Wasser, and Chris Dougherty outlines findings from Dangerous Straits, a recent strategic-operational wargame exploring a fictional 2027 war between China and the United States over Taiwan.

The wargame, hosted by the Gaming Lab at CNAS, in partnership with NBC’s Meet the Press, illuminated the dilemmas that U.S. and Chinese policymakers might face if China were to invade Taiwan, along with the strategies they might adopt to achieve their overarching objectives.

The wargame indicated a protracted conflict rather than a short war is likely if China decides to invade Taiwan. Neither side felt as though it had lost, but both had depleted their missile inventories, sustained significant losses, and still needed to resupply and rearm forces under attack. Preventing China from a quick triumph over Taipei did not equate to an American and Taiwanese victory.

Drawing from the findings of the wargame, the authors assert that the United States and its allies and partners must take several steps to change the Indo-Pacific military balance in their favor to deter China from invading Taiwan and prevent war. These steps include the following: 

The U.S. Department of Defense should make sustained investments in long-range precision-guided weapons and undersea capabilities, while also enhancing the resiliency of its posture in the Indo-Pacific region and deepening planning with key allies and partners.

The U.S. Department of Defense should plan for a protracted conflict and develop ways to reduce the risks of inadvertent escalation with a nuclear armed China.

The U.S. Congress should enable key improvements in the Indo-Pacific through the Pacific Deterrence Initiative and should help shape Taiwan’s military posture. 

Taiwan must improve its defensive capabilities by investing in asymmetric, resilient, and attritable capabilities; increasing training for its active and reserve forces; and by stockpiling key weapons and supplies.

The full report can be found here.

SFU: Post-doctoral fellowship on pandemics and borders

The Pandemics and Borders Project is an international and interdisciplinary research group, based at Simon Fraser University (SFU) in Canada, studying the use of travel measures during public health emergencies. The team bridges the fields of political science, economics, public policy, infectious disease modelling and genomics. The team is recruiting for a Postdoctoral Fellowship in border management and global public health. The Postdoctoral Fellow will contribute to national and global efforts to understand and better respond to global health threats by conducting ground- breaking research to inform future border management.

The team invites recent and near PhD graduates with expertise in social sciences and/or public policy. The ideal candidate will have knowledge and experience of mixed (qualitative and quantitative) methods applied to public policy issues. Experience of risk assessment or simulation-based gaming is an asset.

You’ll find the full announcement below.

For examples of some of the serious gaming associated with this project, see:

Some members of the project team were also involved in Canada’s COVID-19 vaccine red-teaming and tabletop exercise.

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