PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

But we don’t treat women or minorities any different here!

Now that the dust has settled on my Wavell Room and D&I in 2020 essays, I thought I’d address a couple of the points raised in response:

Straight white men have diversity too!

Yes, so do Ford Escorts. The red ones fade a bit, a family car gets more battered than a single-owner/occupant. But real diversity is having Vauxhalls and Puegots and Volvos and Fiats and Landrovers on the road. And “but what about men! Men are diverse” is just another way to shut down diversity conversations by keeping the focus on the people already in the majority.

The point of all these D&I conversations is that diversity of thought—which we all agree is good for wargaming—comes from diversity of experience, and while straight white men do have different life experiences, there is an order-of-magnitude difference in the life experiences of BAME/BIPOC people, disabled people, LGBT people and women: because they live in different neighbourhoods, go to different schools, come from different cultures, experience different challenges day-in-day-out, and have to deal with things that straight white men barely even acknowledge exist.

But the bar isn’t higher for not being a straight white non-disabled man!

Oh realy?

Men (which, let’s face it, is 98% of you reading this): how often have you published an essay in a respected professional space and been met with a torrent of personal attacks, none of them addressing the points raised in the essay, all of them determined to prove YOU’RE WRONG to say any of it because you’re an idiot, because you’re a woman, a lesbian, the wrong class to be properly disabled, not disadvantaged enough, leftist, a victim, a commie, should be doing the dishes, know nothing about professional wargaming or war, and—apparently worst of all—can’t even make it clear you’re talking about professional wargaming not hobby gaming…by publishing in The Wavell Room: contemporary British military thinking. I’m dyslexic and even I’m left wondering which part of the website’s banner is difficult to read ?

Honestly men, how often do you receive hate for doing your wargaming job? Actual shut up and sit down hate, not polite or even heated academic debate, not I disagree so stop talking, actual nothing to say about the essay we’re just objecting that you’re speaking at all. I wasn’t even saying anything particularly controversial: that, when wargaming, we should respect the other players. Playing to win is fine; playing to win at all costs—to make the other people around you feel small—is not ok. It sucks to be on the recieving end of it, and it lessens the value of the game for all the reasons we use serious games.

Why is that even controversial? Treat each other with respect and dignity, like fellow human beings.

To which, a small and defensive minority of men lost their minds that my essay was not treating them with respect: that I used bad language, that I was offensive and confrontational. Again, I’m the dyslexic here, and it is remarkable to me how many people had trouble parsing the “arguing against D&I is” in arguing against D&I is the masturbatory indulgence of straight white men. To be clear: nothing in that sentence says all men, or all white men, or all straight men, are jerking off in wargames (except Jeffrey Toobin). But then, the people objecting loudly to the executive summary were just using “omg a woman used naughty words! I am offended!!” to justify arguing against D&I. Surprise.

And if you’re going to argue the language was the problem, not the message: 

a) none of the words I used were actually swearing. Also there was an editorial process, and the language was deemed appropriate for the site and for the message, not gratuitous, not wanton, not offensive.

b) where is your moral panic over the actual swearing and foul language and vile attacks against my personhood in the comments in the Wavell Room, on twitter, or on PAXsims?

c) when you object to a woman “swearing” by actually swearing yourself in angry comments, boy do you look childish.

d) claiming the moral highground (the language is the problem!!) while abjectly failing to take the moral highground (I object to the language but want to engage on the points being made) is laughable, by the way.

The truth is it’s all Rule One: if the language was made acceptable there would just be something else they’d find fault with because it’s not the language that’s the problem, it’s the challenge to unquestioned male domination and the idea that men can’t just behave as they like when they like without consequences.

We have to talk about how angry women and minorities feel

I want to talk about power and comfort, specifically who has it and whose we are more concerned about, as evidenced by our actions. This might not be a comfortable conversation, but let’s think about it by way of an analogy to comedy:

while the popular conversation keeps talking about the victimhood of comedy, punching up, and punching down, I don’t think those terms are what applies at all. There is a much simpler way of framing the conversation of the goals of comedy, and it was said by the brilliant W. Kumau Bell:

“Who do you want to include? Who do you not want to include?”

These two questions are at the center of pretty much everything. From the way we use signifiers, to the politics of being PC, to the vehemence of being anti-PC, to who you want to make laugh in an audience. It’s all that simple question: who do you want to include? Because that’s when you start looking at your morality and your shape of interest. For instance, who do you want your joke to make feel more comfortable: a rapist or a rape victim? Answer however you wish, but it speaks to what you’re trying to do.

Film Crit Hulk, PC Culture vs The Big Joke

Who do we want to include?

A small and defensive minority seem to think D&I is about excluding straight white men from wargaming in general and opportunities in particular. As far as I can tell there’s a deep-seated fear, particularly among hobby wargamers, that a queer woman has the power to take wargaming away from them and that my goal in life is to CONTROL HOW WARGAMERS ARE ALLOWED TO THINK…through the medium of an essay that literally—explicitly—made the point that domination in gaming is bad and not what I stand for.

Not to mention how laughable the idea is that a single woman is in any way able to exclude 98% of wargamers from wargaming. Or the part where the majority of my wargaming colleagues and friends are straight white men: men I like and respect and enjoy working with, who have mentored and supported me, and given me amazing opportunities to grow as a wargamer.

D&I is not about excluding men. It’s about not excluding women and minorities—who face considerable barriers to entry not faced by straight white non-disabled men.

A big theme in the diversity card deck is anger. Anger at not being listened to. Anger at not being treated like credible human beings or the subject matter experts that they are. Anger that it is literally not safe to be a woman in wargaming/NatSec at times. And above all, anger at a system that is more interested in the comfort of straight white men than the victims of their bad behaviour.

A system that requires women and minorities to put up and shut up or get out—change teams, roles, projects, capabilities, divisions, or sacrifice their careers, to escape.

I’ve heard from so many people who’ve said their bully wasn’t dealt with because:

  • he’ll be deploying as a reservist soon, and likely won’t return to the group or in a leadership position (haha, of course he did)
  • he’ll be taking early retirement soon (nope: still here)
  • it’s just how he is (boys will be boys)
  • he’s like that with everyone, it’s nothing against you personally
  • leadership/management didn’t hear the request for help to deal with the situation—assumed the victim was capable of dealing with it themselves, rather than thinking about why the issue had been raised in the first place.

Privilege and the comfort of straight white men

Privilege is being able to choose not to think about this, to choose when you think about this, and to put it down when you don’t like it right now.

Meanwhile, let’s think about

… the constant efforts women [and minorities] end up having to expend in managing, maintaining, and adjusting the egos of oblivious and self-important men, involving the continual work of imaginative identification, or interpretive labour. The work carries over on every level. 

Women [and minorities] everywhere are always expected to continually imagine what one situation or another would look like from a male point of view. Men are almost never expected to do the same for women [and minorities]. 

So deeply internalised is this pattern of behaviour that many men react to any suggestion that they might do otherwise as if it were itself an act of violence.

David Graeber

I think people assume I am brave and unafraid to be vocal about D&I in professional wargaming. The truth is it is frightening and stressful, and speaking out like this has been career-limiting for me in the past. I am scared. I am angry. And I know from personal experience that there’s only so much a woman can push back before being put soundly in her place. I want that to change.

Psychologists created a study in 2015 to examine what happens when women and men become angry during jury deliberations.

They created a simulation that echoed the classic film Twelve Angry Men, in which a lone juror, Henry Fonda, gives an impassioned and angry plea for the innocence of an accused man. In the simulation, one “holdout” refuses to fall in line with other jurors and does not rein in his (or her) anger. 

The “Henry Fonda” juror did well in influencing his peers. But “Henrietta Fonda” was not nearly as successful. 

When men expressed anger, the subjects found them credible and changed their own opinions. But the angry women were seen as too emotional, so their arguments did not persuade the other “jurors” to change their minds

Men can convince others that the cause of their anger is appropriate, and can persuade others to accept their arguments. An angry woman rarely gets that opportunity. 

Why women and anger too often collide

Men more often associate anger with feeling powerful, while for women anger is associated with powerlessness.

Anger is silent and isolating, destructive and even frightening.

Anger is a powerful emotion—it warns us of threat, insult, indignity and harm. But across the world, girls and women are taught that their anger is better left unvoiced.

Anger is reserved as the moral property of boys and men. It is a civic virtue in white men, criminality in black men, and distained in women. [And it’s ingratitude in disabled people.]

Women are taught to swallow their pride.

Anger is conveying what’s important to us—but people are more likely to get angry AT women for being angry than address their concerns. Men are rewarded for displaying anger, women are punished.

It is a system designed to disadvantage women when it comes to defending themselves and their own interests.

Societies that don’t respect women’s anger don’t respect women. The danger of it [to men] is that it shows how seriously we take ourselves. And that we expect other people to take us seriously as well.

Watch the rest of this TED talk here.

Women and minorities are angry at being unjustly treated.

They are right to be angry.

Men: your focus should be on working your hardest to dismantle the man-made and man-supported system that is causing the anger, not policing their emotions. 

That means stopping to think about whether the real cause of your anger is that the thing was said or done by a woman stepping outside the bounds of “acceptably feminine” by refusing to do all the emotional labour for you.

That means calling out misogynist and homophobic and transphobic and ablist and racist behaviour when you see it—in wargaming spaces, in comments, on twitter, in person.

That means amplifying the voices of women and minorities when they speak to their experiences of discrimination.

That means telling women and BAME/BIPOC and LGBT and disabled wargamers that you value their existence, their humanity, their right to take up space, and their contributions to wargaming—not just assuming folks know you’re a decent human being who thinks this stuff without ever publically expressing it.

The standard you walk past is the one you accept

I like this ballsy statement from former Chief of the Australian army, Lt Gen David Morrison:

If you become aware of any individual degrading another, then show moral courage and take a stand against it. […] The standard you walk past is the standard you accept. That goes for all of us, but especially those, who by their rank, have a leadership role.

To everyone who liked and RTd my Wavell Room essay

Thank you, I appreciate the support. 

Talking about D&I in safe spaces among people that you know won’t disagree with you is a start. It’s not enough. 

How many of you pushed back against the trolls and the misogynism and homophobia directed at me for doing my job? (Shout out to Rex Brynen and Jeremy Sepinsky for being absolute heroes in the Wavell Room troll pit.)

How many of you read my new year essay—literally about how silence from the majority who support D&I is part of the problem—and said nothing to me, or in public, or to other women and minority wargamers in support?

The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.

Make your standard the Derby House Principles for diversity and inclusion in professional wargaming.

8 responses to “But we don’t treat women or minorities any different here!

  1. Sue Collins 22/02/2021 at 8:50 am

    Sally, thanks for the article – by writing about this in a public forum, it makes it easier for me to call out racist / homophobic / sexist behavior when I see it. Also ‘the standard you walk past is the standard you accept’ is now my new favourite saying.

  2. Jay Sorensen 21/02/2021 at 3:39 pm

    @typeatme Perhaps it would help you to think of inclusion as a tool for doing wargaming better, so that “getting wargaming right to protect society” is more readily accomplished. Even if you’re too much of a bigot to support diversity and inclusion for their own sakes, maybe you’re capable of understanding that diverse perspectives enhance creativity and lead to better results.

  3. typeatme 20/02/2021 at 3:01 pm

    Your focus is skew to what is important.
    The reality of what really matters to getting wargaming right as a tool to protect society really has very little, 2nd order at best, to where you seem to want to beat your chest.
    Sorry, I can’t take you seriously.

  4. Tracy Johnson 20/02/2021 at 2:29 pm

    @Sally … Correct, what better way than to put SOF(WG)² prefix in front of the remaining 98% so that they are on the same plane as the other groups that require a prefix? (However I’m having a gut feeling this is how the caste system in India got started.)

  5. Tracy Johnson 20/02/2021 at 2:22 pm

    @Brant … I need to promote this meme. No better way than to use a military style mod to my acronym by putting a superscripted number 2 on it. Adding “War Gamer” to acronym.

    It should be now: SOF(WG)²

  6. Brant 20/02/2021 at 11:29 am

    @Tracy – a recent Facebook flame war referred to many of the wargaming community as EWDOF (Evil White Dudes Over Fifty)

  7. Sally Davis 20/02/2021 at 9:35 am

    I don’t think straight white men are lacking a place…they are 98% of wargaming, they hold the majority of leadership positions and publish the majority of wargames, papers, and presentations. They are included by default in the definition of wargamers and wargaming. The fact that we have to preface other wargamers as women, LGBT, BAME/BIPOC, or disabled is evidence enough that “wargamer” is taken to mean straight and white and man unless otherwise stated.

  8. Tracy Johnson 20/02/2021 at 9:31 am

    I’m in agreement here. I also think straight white men need a place and an acronym so we can be included in the diverse community. But instead of SWM, we should use a bit of self-deprecating humor because we can’t go down the prophetic road of Orwell and Huxley leading to thought crimes. Let’s face it, a large portion of the wargaming community are not just straight, white, and male, but are also a bit older and overweight. I nominate the term (and dare I say it): SOFWG for “Straight Old Fat White Guys”. Seriously, this is so we can admit who we are in our safe place.

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