PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Daily Archives: 17/01/2020

Simulation & Gaming (February 2020)

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The latest issue of Simulation & Gaming 51, 1 (February 2020) is now available.

Editorial

  • A Tribute to Some of Our Pioneers, Past and Present as We Move Beyond 50 Years With Simulation & Gaming
    • Timothy C. Clapper
  • Acknowledgment of Reviewers of Simulation & Gaming for 2019

Articles

  • The Evolution of Simulation-Based Learning Across the Disciplines, 1965–2018: A Science Map of the Literature
    • Philip Hallinger and Ray Wang
  • Do Badges Affect Intrinsic Motivation in Introductory Programming Students?
    • Lisa Facey-Shaw, Marcus Specht, Peter van Rosmalen, and Jeanette Bartley-Bryan
  • Video Game Pursuit (VGPu) Scale Development: Designing and Validating a Scale With Implications for Game-Based Learning and Assessment
    • Diana R. Sanchez and Markus Langer
  • Health$en$eTM: Developing a Board Game on Value-based Healthcare Financing
    • Harold Tan, Yap Chun Wei, Heng Wei Yun, Koh Eng Hui Joan, Ho Wai Yee, and Lim Yee Juan

 

Strategic decisions with simulations (conference)

TUHH19-320.pngUPDATE: This conference has been cancelled due to the current COVID-19 epidemic.

On 19 March 2020, the Technischen Universität Hamburg, in conjunction with the German Institute for Defence and Strategic Studies (GIDS) and the Führungsakademie der Bundeswehr (German Command and Staff College) will be holding a conference on Zukunftsorientierte Steuerung – Strategische Entscheidungen mit Simulationen fundiert treffen (Future-oriented control – making strategic decisions with simulations).

Further information can be found at the link.

NATO OR&A conference proceedings

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The proceedings of the 2019 NATO Operations Research & Analysis conference have now been published on the NATO STO website. These include a number of wargaming presentation (including a keynote address by Stephen Downes Martin).

Most of the papers are open access, but a few are marked are marked NATO Unclassified (Releasable to PFP and Australia). To access those files you will need STO log-in credentials.

We published a report on the conference at PAXsims back in October.

David and DeRosa: Wargaming Contested Narratives in an Age of Bewilderment

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At The Strategy Bridge, Arnel P. David and John DeRosa discuss “Wargaming Contested Narratives in an Age of Bewilderment.”

The Contested Narratives Wargame builds on the assertions from Peter Perla and Ed McGrady that wargames “embod[y] two types of narrative: the presented narrative, which is what we call the written or given narrative, created by the game’s designers; and the constructed narrative, which is developed through the actions, statements, and decisions of the game’s participants.”[1] Over the course of the game, select participants shared presented narratives (pre-scripted stories) to amplify or dampen adversary and friendly narratives. Participants then moved between tables developing constructed narratives (revised scripts) amidst the various contested narratives. Using the World Café method, a professionally and nationally diverse group of participants took turns sharing stories of national resilience against malign influence wherein the pre-scripted presented narratives contest for resonance.

The World Café is an exploratory method, designed by Juanita Brown and David Isaacs, that elicits communication patterns.[2] Set in a café-like environment with multiple tables, participants are invited to sit in small groups with participants from other nations. A facilitator initiates the conversation with a narrative prompt to the entire room—“share a story about national resilience,” for example. Then the participants engage in multiple rounds of storytelling. Paper tablecloths and colored pens allow participants to scribble and take notes creating artifacts for later review. As participants move around the room, narratives begin to circulate. Contestation emerges as designated players introduce stories scripted prior to the wargame from an adversary’s perspective. At the end of several rounds, Dr. John DeRosa—game designer, lead facilitator, and one of the authors—led discussions with the participants to find the l’entre deux, the between place, of presented and constructed narratives circulating within the room. In this sense, the process seeks to reveal if elements of the pre-scripted narratives (like those representing the adversary) appear in the revised scripts developed within the wargame.

Two key insights emerged. First, stories coupled with symbols construct powerfully resonant narratives. Second, unlike the linear action-counteraction-reaction model of traditional wargames, methods like the World Café can effectively mimic the complexity of the human dimension.

More at the link above.

h/t Mark Jones Jr.

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