PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

simulation and gaming miscellany, 30 December 2019

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PAXsims is pleased to present some recent items on conflict simulation and serious 9and not-so-serious) gaming that may be of interest to our readers.

PAXsims

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According to Breaking Defense, a recent series of US Army wargames suggest that robots and AI make a difference on the battlefield:

How big a difference does it make when you reinforce foot troopswith drones and ground robots? You get about a 10–fold increase in combat power, according to a recent Army wargame.

“Their capabilities were awesome,” said Army Capt. Philip Belanger, a Ranger Regiment and Stryker Brigade veteran who commanded a robot-reinforced platoon in nearly a dozen computer-simulated battles at the Fort Benning’s Maneuver Battle Lab. “We reduced the risk to US forces to zero, basically, and still were able to accomplish the mission.”

That mission: dislodge a defending company of infantry, about 120 soldiers, with a single platoon of just 40 attackers on foot. That’s a task that would normally be assigned to a battalion of over 600. In other words, instead of the minimum 3:1 superiority in numbers that military tradition requires for a successful attack, Belanger’s simulated force was outnumbered 1:3.

When they ran the scenario without futuristic technologies, using the infantry platoon as it exists today, “that did not go well for us,” Belanger said drily.

That’s all very interesting, but it just seems to show that an unsupported infantry platoon does not do as well as one with augmented ISR, air support, and direct and indirect fire support—which is not all that surprising. Whether drones and robots represent the most cost-effective way of strengthening platoon combat capacities (compared to legacy systems or other, alternative technologies) would require a somewhat different research design.

PAXsims

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Back in November, War on the Rocks featured a piece examining what to expect if the US were to withdraw from NATO:

A policy game prepared by Körber-Stiftung and the International Institute for Strategic Studies sought to answer these questions this summer in Berlin. Five country teams with experts from France, Germany, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States addressed a fictional scenario that involved a U.S. withdrawal from NATO, followed by crises in a NATO member state in the western Balkans and across Eastern Europe. How would Europeans react to such a scenario? What are the red lines, interests, and priorities of the respective actors? How might Europeans organize their defense if the United States withdraws from NATO, and what role could the United States play in European security after the withdrawal?

The results of the game were sobering, with no clear upside for any of the participating teams. While a one-time simulation exercise, it provided valuable insights into the interests and preferences of European member states.

You can read a fuller account of the game and its findings at the link above.

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CGSA-logo1.pngThe Canadian Game Studies Association is inviting paper proposals for its annual conference on 3-5 June 2020.

The 2020 Canadian Game Studies Association (CGSA/ACÉV) annual conference will be held June 3 to June 5 at Western University in London, Ontario, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities & Social Sciences.

We invite submissions from researchers in any discipline working on any topic related to games, digital or analog. Graduate student submissions are welcome and encouraged! CGSA accepts submissions in both English and French, but please note that most presentations and social events will be in English.

CGSA has always worked to support diverse scholars and creators and proactively make space for studies of gender, race, sexuality, ability, class, and other forms of diversity in games and gaming cultures. In keeping with this year’s Congress theme of Bridging Divides: Confronting Colonialism and Anti-Black Racism, and in response to last year’s disturbing incident of racial profiling of a graduate student member of the Black Canadian Studies Association, we especially invite submissions from Black and/or Indigenous scholars, and/or submissions addressing colonialism and anti-Black racism in relation to games and gaming culture. Accepted papers and panels that meet these criteria will be highlighted in special plenary sessions throughout the conference. Additionally, Black and/or Indigenous graduate students accepted to the conference will be eligible for a small bursary to offset travel and registration costs.

The deadline for proposals is January 20 Additional details at http://gamestudies.ca/conference/

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On 4-5 December, officials from 17 African countries took part in a simulation exercise being conducted jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Africa Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the West Africa Health Organization.

The purpose of the exercise is to test the capacities and level of readiness of the PHEOC [public health emergency operations centre] of the participating countries as well as communication and information sharing between PHEOCs. The aims of the exercise include: testing the existence of the legal authority needed for the PHEOC to operate; testing existing plans and procedures for operations including the implementation of Incident Management System (IMS); define linkages with national emergency management authorities; and test communication and information-sharing capabilities between PHEOCs in the region . The exercise will help in identifying areas of strength to be built upon and opportunities for improvement. After the exercise, an action plan will be developed to address the gaps identified.

The two-day exercise will be followed by a regional-level debriefing session and a post-exercise report on each country’s PHEOC readiness and capabilities….

PAXsims

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Students at Georgetown University – Qatar recently conducted a crisis simulation of the Iran nuclear issue. The Gulf Times contains a brief account:

The simulation is part of GU-Q’s International Negotiation Lab course for students of international affairs. Three workshops introduced students to the workings of a simulation, taught negotiation skills, and provided a subject matter briefing on the crisis. Then students were divided into teams representing China, France, Germany, Iran, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. They were also provided substantive briefings on the current crisis and explanations of the underlying political dynamics.
Dr Christine Schiwietz, assistant dean for academic affairs at GU-Q and course organiser, stressed the importance of understanding international diplomacy through hands-on experience, not only through classroom learning. “Experiential learning through the Crisis Simulation, which is a credit-bearing course, is an integral component of the Georgetown curriculum. It challenges students to apply what they’ve learned in the classroom to the real world, which helps them connect theory and practice.”

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A RAND report earlier this year examined NATO’s Amphibious Forces: Command and Control of a Multibrigade Alliance Task Force.

In 2017–2018, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa asked the RAND Corporation to design and facilitate three events with the objective of identifying suitable C2 constructs and associated doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership, personnel, facilities, and interoperability considerations for large-scale NATO maritime and amphibious operations. Aided by a scenario centered on confrontation with a near-peer competitor, maritime and amphibious leaders explored how to leverage NATO’s existing amphibious capacity by aggregating national capabilities into a coherent C2 structure….

 

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