PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

Monthly Archives: December 2019

PAXsims year-end review 2019

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As I write this 2020 is almost upon us—so I thought it would be a good time to summarize the past year here at PAXsims.

Most notable of all, we had our best year ever, with 120,666 visits from from 64,168 visitors. This is slightly higher than last year’s total of 119,623 visits. We also currently have 488 email and WordPress subscribers.

Overall, PAXsims has have had a remarkable 823,427 page visits since 2009. At this rate we should reach the one million mark in a year and a half or so.

We had visitors from 188 countries and territories in 2019—almost the entire world. As usual, the US accounts for by far the largest share of our readers:

  1. United States 43.0%
  2. United Kingdom 12.7%
  3. Canada 9.4%
  4. Netherlands 3.1%
  5. China +Hong Kong 3.9%
  6. Australia 2.7%
  7. Germany 2.3%
  8. France 2.3%
  9. Japan 1.8%
  10. Italy 1.7%

The rise of China in our reader statistics is noteworthy. By contrast, Russia only accounts for 0.3% of visitors.

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We posted 148 new items in 2018. The five most popular of these were:

  1. AFTERSHOCK(S)
  2. Lacey: Teaching operational maneuver
  3. Matt Caffrey’s “On Wargaming” available as free download

  4. Room to game (or, the Battle of Winterfell explained)

  5. A “horrible, one-sided deal”: A US-Iran matrix game

Our most popular piece of all time is—quite rightly—The wargaming Wrens of the Western Approaches Tactical Unit.

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Brian Train retains his lifetime achievement award as our most prolific commentator on articles.

Tomorrow we will summarize the results of out 2019 reader survey, with further insight into who you all are, what you all do, and what you would like to see from us in 2020. Happy New Year!

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Recent simulation and gaming publications, December 2019

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PAXsims is pleased to present a selection of recently-published items on simulation and serious gaming. Some of these may not address conflict, peacebuilding, or development issues at all, but have been included because of the broader perspective they offer on games-based education or analysis.

Articles may be gated/paywalled and not accessible without subscription access to the publication in which they appear.


Shahar Avin, Ross Gruetzemacher, and James Fox, “Exploring AI Futures Through Role Play,” Proceedings of the 2020 AAAI/ACM Conference on AI, Ethics, and Society (AIES ’20), Feb. 7-8, 2020.

We present an innovative methodology for studying and teaching the impacts of AI through a role-play game. The game serves two primary purposes: 1) training AI developers and AI policy professionals to reflect on and prepare for future social and ethical challenges related to AI and 2) exploring possible futures involving AI technology development, deployment, social impacts, and governance. While the game currently focuses on the inter-relations between short-, mid- and long- term impacts of AI, it has potential to be adapted for a broad range of scenarios, exploring in greater depths issues of AI policy research and affording training within organizations. The game presented here has undergone two years of development and has been tested through over 30 events involving between 3 and 70 participants. The game is under active development, but preliminary findings suggest that role-play is a promising methodology for both exploring AI futures and training individuals and organizations in thinking about, and reflecting on, the impacts of AI and strategic mistakes that can be avoided today.


Agostino G. Bruzzone and Robert Sottile, eds., The 9th International Defence and Homeland Security Simulation Workshop (2019).

[conference proceedings]


Christian Dayé, “Negotiating Rules for the Game: Political Games at RAND, 1954–1956,” in  Experts, Social Scientists, and Techniques of Prognosis in Cold War America (Springer, 2019).

This chapter describes the second approach to expert prognosis developed at RAND, political gaming. Conceived by members of RAND’s Social Science Division, among them Herbert Goldhamer, Hans Speier, and Paul Kecskemeti, political gaming had experts form groups to represent political decision-makers. These groups had to react to a pregiven scenario, and their reactions were aggregated by the game leaders to form the basis for the next round.

At RAND, this approach to gaming formed both an addition and an alternative to a more dominant approach of strategy analysis, game theory, and game-theoretic modeling. The chapter thus first briefly sketches the development of game theory and then proceeds to describe the four rounds of political gaming that were carried out by RAND’s Social Science Division.


Ralph “Dinz” Dinsley and Christopher J. Newman, “Focusing the Space Law Games: Overcoming Operational and Legal Barriers to Space Situational Awareness,” Advanced Maui Optical and Space Surveillance Technologies Conference (2019).

Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in the orbital population. The licensing of a number of large constellations means that this is set to increase dramatically. A significant number of technical advances have facilitated this and, this has been matched by an increased policy focus on the need for increased space surveillance and tracking, culminating in 2018 for the USA, in Space Presidential Directive 3. The rise of mega- constellations and other innovations, such as active debris removal or on-orbit servicing procedures means ever more data of space is going to be needed to keep track of the increasing burden placed on the orbital environment. The provision of corroborated information which removes as much ambiguity as possible about the position of objects in orbit is crucial to both safe and sustainable satellite operations. Yet, despite this pressing need, there are considerable barriers that exist to obtaining a more complete picture of this information.

This paper will outline these problems in detail. It will be proposed that what is required is both codification of the norms for safe sustainable satellite operations and clarity on protocols for evidence gathering in cases where a collision has resulted in damage to a space asset and fault may be an issue. This discussion will identify that a way in which this could be achieved is by the use of “space law games”, which will utilize established military wargaming methodology whereby complex fictional scenarios could highlight some of the key operational and legal issues that might need to be dealt with. Perla (1990: p.23) suggests the integration of realism and playability in a delicate balancing act designed to achieve a well-understood and well-chosen objective is a key. The paper will outline some of the ways in which the space law games might work and pose questions as to what data and other considerations will be needed to make such simulations meaningful. By identifying the data gaps in the fictional ‘law game’ scenario will help locate possible areas of enhancement in space surveillance and tracking capacity to support future SSA.


Per-Idar Evensen, Marius Halsør, Svein Erlend Martinussen, Dan Helge Bentsen, “Wargaming Evolved: Methodology and Best Practices for Simulation-Supported Wargaming,” Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation, and Education Conference (I/ITSEC), 2019.

When developing and assessing future force structures, wargaming is a key activity for better understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the force structures. Today simulation systems let us create synthetic environments that to a high degree replicate the physical properties of the real world for these wargames. Furthermore, advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and behavior modeling has given us more realistic computer-generated forces (CGF) that can execute battle drills and lower level tactics with a fairly high degree of realism. However, at the higher levels of the chain of command, AI has not yet replaced human leadership, and planning and conducting simulated operations require participation of officers.

For more than a decade, the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) has supported the Norwegian Army with conducting wargames for capability planning, with varying degree of simulation support. Throughout this period, the wargames have evolved from what can be described as computer-assisted wargames towards more realistic simulation-supported wargames. Moreover, to get a closer understanding of the deterrent effect of the force structures, which may not be observable when monitoring the actual gameplay, our emphasis has also shifted towards replicating the planning process more properly, and especially on monitoring the planning process of the opposing force. For example, it has been important to find out to what extent specific structure elements discourage the opposing force from taking certain actions.

In this paper, we describe our evolved methodology for simulation-supported wargaming, which includes a preparation phase, a gaming and execution phase, including a planning process, and an analysis phase. Furthermore, we discuss what type of data and results we are able to extract from the wargaming sessions, and present a set of best practices for how to conduct successful simulation-supported wargames.


Andreas Haggman, “Cyber Wargaming: Finding, Designing, and Playing Wargames for Cyber Security Education,” PhD thesis, Royal Holloway, University of London (February 2019).

This thesis investigates, and contributes to, the use of wargaming in cyber security education. Wargaming has a rich history of pedagogic use, but little work exists that addresses the critically important subject of cyber security. Cyber security is a global problem that frequently makes news headlines, yet the field is dogged with a reputation as a domain only for technologists, when in fact cyber security requires a whole gamut of approaches to be properly understood.

The thesis is broadly divided into three parts. The first part is a comprehensive literature review of wargaming scholarship, analysing the benefits and drawbacks of wargaming, and some of the justifications for why a tabletop boardgame may be more effective than a game enhanced by technology. Following on from this, the thesis provides an outline of current work in cyber wargaming by analysing existing games, evaluating their contributions as educational tools, and identifying successful game mechanics and components.

The second part of the thesis outlines the design process of an original wargame created for cyber security education and awareness training. The analysis outlines what the game design intends to achieve in terms of pedagogical outcomes and how the design evolved through the development process. In this part some methodological considerations around the research are also analysed, including how the thesis uses grounded theory and ethnography as academic underpinnings, and issues around the researcher’s positionality during fieldwork.

The final part of the thesis reports on the deployment of the original game to a wide variety of organisations. Both quantitative and qualitative data is analysed to ascertain what players learned from playing the game and evaluates the effectiveness of the game by comparing it to previous theoretical findings. Finally, the researcher’s experiences of conducting the thesis are evaluated with close reference to the identified methodological considerations.


Philip Hammond and Holger Pötzsch, eds., War Games: Memory, Militarism and the Subject of Play (Bloomsbury, 2019).

Many of today’s most commercially successful videogames, from Call of Duty to Company of Heroes, are war-themed titles that play out in what are framed as authentic real-world settings inspired by recent news headlines or drawn from history. While such games are marketed as authentic representations of war, they often provide a selective form of realism that eschews problematic, yet salient aspects of war. In addition, changes in the way Western states wage and frame actual wars makes contemporary conflicts increasingly resemble videogames when perceived from the vantage point of Western audiences.

This interdisciplinary volume brings together scholars from games studies, media and cultural studies, politics and international relations, and related fields to examine the complex relationships between military-themed videogames and real-world conflict, and to consider how videogames might deal with history, memory, and conflict in alternative ways. It asks: What is the role of videogames in the formation and negotiation of cultural memory of past wars? How do game narratives and designs position the gaming subject in relation to history, war and militarism? And how far do critical, anti-war/peace games offer an alternative or challenge to mainstream commercial titles?


Glennn Moy and Slava Shekh, “The Application of AlphaZero to Wargaming,” AI 2019: Advances in Artificial Intelligence (2019).

In this paper, we explore the process of automatically learning to play wargames using AlphaZero deep reinforcement learning. We consider a simple wargame, Coral Sea, which is a turn-based game played on a hexagonal grid between two players. We explore the differences between Coral Sea and traditional board games, where the successful use of AlphaZero has been demonstrated. Key differences include: problem representation, wargame asymmetry, limited strategic depth, and the requirement for significant hardware resources. We demonstrate how bootstrapping AlphaZero with supervised learning can overcome these challenges. In the context of Coral Sea, this enables AlphaZero to learn optimal play and outperform the supervised examples on which it was trained.


Dan Öberg, “Exercising war: How tactical and operational modelling shape and reify military practice,” Security Dialogue, first published 19 December 2019.

This article analyzes how contemporary military training and exercises shape and reify specific modalities of war. Historically, military training has shifted from being individual- and experience-oriented, towards becoming modelled into exercise environments and practices. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with military officers, exercise controllers, and war-game designers, the article distinguishes between tactical training, characterized by military functions embodied through weapon platforms in a demarcated battlespace, and operational training, characterized by administrative and organizational processes embodied through self-referential staff routines. As military exercises integrate the tactical and operational dimensions into a model for warfare, they serve as blueprints for today’s battles at the same time as they perpetuate a martial viewpoint of the world. As a result, preparations for potential future conflicts constitute a fertile ground for apprehending the becoming of war.


Jon Saklofske, Alyssa Arbuckle, Jon Bath, Feminist War Games?: Mechanisms of War, Feminist Values, and Interventional Games (Routledge, 2019).

Feminist War Games? explores the critical intersections and collisions between feminist values and perceptions of war, by asking whether feminist values can be asserted as interventional approaches to the design, play, and analysis of games that focus on armed conflict and economies of violence.

Focusing on the ways that games, both digital and table-top, can function as narratives, arguments, methods, and instruments of research, the volume demonstrates the impact of computing technologies on our perceptions, ideologies, and actions. Exploring the compatibility between feminist values and systems of war through games is a unique way to pose destabilizing questions, solutions, and approaches; to prototype alternative narratives; and to challenge current idealizations and assumptions. Positing that feminist values can be asserted as a critical method of design, as an ideological design influence, and as a lens that determines how designers and players interact with and within arenas of war, the book addresses the persistence and brutality of war and issues surrounding violence in games, whilst also considering the place and purpose of video games in our cultural moment.

Feminist War Games? is a timely volume that questions the often-toxic nature of online and gaming cultures. As such, the book will appeal to a broad variety of disciplinary interests, including sociology, education, psychology, literature, history, politics, game studies, digital humanities, media and cultural studies, and gender studies, as well as those interested in playing, or designing, socially engaged games.

simulation and gaming miscellany, 30 December 2019

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PAXsims is pleased to present some recent items on conflict simulation and serious 9and not-so-serious) gaming that may be of interest to our readers.

PAXsims

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According to Breaking Defense, a recent series of US Army wargames suggest that robots and AI make a difference on the battlefield:

How big a difference does it make when you reinforce foot troopswith drones and ground robots? You get about a 10–fold increase in combat power, according to a recent Army wargame.

“Their capabilities were awesome,” said Army Capt. Philip Belanger, a Ranger Regiment and Stryker Brigade veteran who commanded a robot-reinforced platoon in nearly a dozen computer-simulated battles at the Fort Benning’s Maneuver Battle Lab. “We reduced the risk to US forces to zero, basically, and still were able to accomplish the mission.”

That mission: dislodge a defending company of infantry, about 120 soldiers, with a single platoon of just 40 attackers on foot. That’s a task that would normally be assigned to a battalion of over 600. In other words, instead of the minimum 3:1 superiority in numbers that military tradition requires for a successful attack, Belanger’s simulated force was outnumbered 1:3.

When they ran the scenario without futuristic technologies, using the infantry platoon as it exists today, “that did not go well for us,” Belanger said drily.

That’s all very interesting, but it just seems to show that an unsupported infantry platoon does not do as well as one with augmented ISR, air support, and direct and indirect fire support—which is not all that surprising. Whether drones and robots represent the most cost-effective way of strengthening platoon combat capacities (compared to legacy systems or other, alternative technologies) would require a somewhat different research design.

PAXsims

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Back in November, War on the Rocks featured a piece examining what to expect if the US were to withdraw from NATO:

A policy game prepared by Körber-Stiftung and the International Institute for Strategic Studies sought to answer these questions this summer in Berlin. Five country teams with experts from France, Germany, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States addressed a fictional scenario that involved a U.S. withdrawal from NATO, followed by crises in a NATO member state in the western Balkans and across Eastern Europe. How would Europeans react to such a scenario? What are the red lines, interests, and priorities of the respective actors? How might Europeans organize their defense if the United States withdraws from NATO, and what role could the United States play in European security after the withdrawal?

The results of the game were sobering, with no clear upside for any of the participating teams. While a one-time simulation exercise, it provided valuable insights into the interests and preferences of European member states.

You can read a fuller account of the game and its findings at the link above.

PAXsims

CGSA-logo1.pngThe Canadian Game Studies Association is inviting paper proposals for its annual conference on 3-5 June 2020.

The 2020 Canadian Game Studies Association (CGSA/ACÉV) annual conference will be held June 3 to June 5 at Western University in London, Ontario, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities & Social Sciences.

We invite submissions from researchers in any discipline working on any topic related to games, digital or analog. Graduate student submissions are welcome and encouraged! CGSA accepts submissions in both English and French, but please note that most presentations and social events will be in English.

CGSA has always worked to support diverse scholars and creators and proactively make space for studies of gender, race, sexuality, ability, class, and other forms of diversity in games and gaming cultures. In keeping with this year’s Congress theme of Bridging Divides: Confronting Colonialism and Anti-Black Racism, and in response to last year’s disturbing incident of racial profiling of a graduate student member of the Black Canadian Studies Association, we especially invite submissions from Black and/or Indigenous scholars, and/or submissions addressing colonialism and anti-Black racism in relation to games and gaming culture. Accepted papers and panels that meet these criteria will be highlighted in special plenary sessions throughout the conference. Additionally, Black and/or Indigenous graduate students accepted to the conference will be eligible for a small bursary to offset travel and registration costs.

The deadline for proposals is January 20 Additional details at http://gamestudies.ca/conference/

PAXsims

On 4-5 December, officials from 17 African countries took part in a simulation exercise being conducted jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Africa Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and the West Africa Health Organization.

The purpose of the exercise is to test the capacities and level of readiness of the PHEOC [public health emergency operations centre] of the participating countries as well as communication and information sharing between PHEOCs. The aims of the exercise include: testing the existence of the legal authority needed for the PHEOC to operate; testing existing plans and procedures for operations including the implementation of Incident Management System (IMS); define linkages with national emergency management authorities; and test communication and information-sharing capabilities between PHEOCs in the region . The exercise will help in identifying areas of strength to be built upon and opportunities for improvement. After the exercise, an action plan will be developed to address the gaps identified.

The two-day exercise will be followed by a regional-level debriefing session and a post-exercise report on each country’s PHEOC readiness and capabilities….

PAXsims

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Students at Georgetown University – Qatar recently conducted a crisis simulation of the Iran nuclear issue. The Gulf Times contains a brief account:

The simulation is part of GU-Q’s International Negotiation Lab course for students of international affairs. Three workshops introduced students to the workings of a simulation, taught negotiation skills, and provided a subject matter briefing on the crisis. Then students were divided into teams representing China, France, Germany, Iran, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. They were also provided substantive briefings on the current crisis and explanations of the underlying political dynamics.
Dr Christine Schiwietz, assistant dean for academic affairs at GU-Q and course organiser, stressed the importance of understanding international diplomacy through hands-on experience, not only through classroom learning. “Experiential learning through the Crisis Simulation, which is a credit-bearing course, is an integral component of the Georgetown curriculum. It challenges students to apply what they’ve learned in the classroom to the real world, which helps them connect theory and practice.”

PAXsims

A RAND report earlier this year examined NATO’s Amphibious Forces: Command and Control of a Multibrigade Alliance Task Force.

In 2017–2018, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Europe and Africa asked the RAND Corporation to design and facilitate three events with the objective of identifying suitable C2 constructs and associated doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership, personnel, facilities, and interoperability considerations for large-scale NATO maritime and amphibious operations. Aided by a scenario centered on confrontation with a near-peer competitor, maritime and amphibious leaders explored how to leverage NATO’s existing amphibious capacity by aggregating national capabilities into a coherent C2 structure….

 

McGill megagame 2020 ticket sale

Atlantic Rim

Do you feel the urge to save Atlantic Canada from the gravest threat in its history? Then you will want to participate in the ATLANTIC RIM megagame at McGill on Sunday, 16 February 2020.

Megagame tickets are discounted until January 1. After that, you’ll have to pay the regular admission price. Students receive an additional discount.

More more details, or to purchase a ticket, go to our Eventbrite ticket page.

If you want to be assigned to the same team as a group of friends, email me everyone’s name and your role preferences after you have all purchased a ticket.

RAND: Gaming the gray zone

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RAND has released a new report by Stacie L. Pettyjohn and Becca Wasser on Competing in the Gray Zone: Russian Tactics and Western Responses. This addresses two major sets of research questions: first, “How are gray zone activities defined? What are different types of gray zone tactics?” and second “Where are vulnerabilities to gray zone tactics in Europe? What are those vulnerabilities?”

Recent events in Crimea and the Donbass in eastern Ukraine have upended relations between Russia and the West, specifically the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union (EU). Although Russia’s actions in Ukraine were, for the most part, acts of outright aggression, Russia has been aiming to destabilize both its “near abroad” — the former Soviet states except for the Baltics — and wider Europe through the use of ambiguous “gray zone” tactics. These tactics include everything from propaganda and disinformation to election interference and the incitement of violence.

To better understand where there are vulnerabilities to Russian gray zone tactics in Europe and how to effectively counter them, the RAND Corporation ran a series of war games. These games comprised a Russian (Red) team, which was tasked with expanding its influence and undermining NATO unity, competing against a European (Green) team and a U.S. (Blue) team, which were aiming to defend their allies from Red’s gray zone activities without provoking an outright war. In these games, the authors of this report observed patterns of behavior from the three teams that are broadly consistent with what has been observed in the real world. This report presents key insights from these games and from the research effort that informed them.

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While the study is interesting enough as it is, RAND has also released a second 45 page monograph by Becca Wasser, Jenny Oberholtzer, Stacie L. Pettyjohn, and William Mackenzie that outlines the gaming methodology adopted: Gaming Gray Zone Tactics: Design Considerations for a Structured Strategic Game.

Research Questions

  1. Can a game model gray zone competition in a empirically ground sound yet playable way?
  2. What is the game design process for developing a structured strategic game for a complex political-military issue that simultaneously operates in two different time horizons?
  3. How can structured strategic gaming help researchers gain an understanding of adversary gray zone tactics and tools?

To explore how Russia could use gray zone tactics and to what effect, the authors of this report developed a strategic-level structured card game examining a gray zone competition between Russia and the West in the Balkans. In these games, the Russian player seeks to expand its influence and undermine NATO unity while competing against a European team and a U.S. team seeking to defend their allies from Russia’s gray zone activities without provoking an outright war. This report details the authors’ development of this game, including key design decisions, elements of the game, how the game is played, and the undergirding research approach. The authors conclude with recommendations for future applications of the game design.

Key Findings

The Balkans gray zone game demonstrated that structured strategy games are useful exploratory tools and this model could be adapted for other contexts and adversaries.

  • While the gray zone remains a murky topic, this game demonstrated that it was feasible to break the gray zone down into concrete parts, to conduct research on each of these parts, and to link these components to create a playable strategic game that yielded useful insights.
  • The scoped and structured approach to this game allowed for enough structure to keep discussions on track and provided links between inputs and outputs while still allowing for creativity, flexibility, and transparency.
  • This gray zone game can be adapted to focus on different regions or adversaries, could include additional allies, or could be made into a three-way competition.

The RAND team started with a series of matrix games to scope out the problem, and then progressed to semi-structured game. Finally, they moved on to creating a structured, three-sided (US, Europe, Russia) gray zone board game focused on the Balkans.

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Countries were tracked for governance quality and diplomatic-political orientation, as well as economic dependence (on Russia) and media freedom.

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Players acted through a deck of action cards, each specific to the actor(s) they represented. Potential Russian (RED) actions are shown above, and sample cards below)

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The report discusses the game design approaches taken, assesses their utility, and concludes with some suggestions as to future modifications.

All-in-all, it is a rare and outstanding example of serious game designers fully documenting their game design approach and research methods so as to inform future work on the issue. Kudos to all!


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Review: Longley-Brown, Successful Professional Wargames (2019)

The following review was contributed to PAXsims by Ben Taylor.


Graham Longley-Brown, Successful Professional Wargames; A Practitioner’s Handbook (History of Wargaming Project, 2019). £21.95 paperback. Kindle version also available.

This book is a valuable addition to the professional wargamer’s library. If this was just a compendium of the best practices from the viewpoint of Graham Longley-Brown, master wargamer, driving force behind the Connections UK conference and all-round good egg, then it would be a worthwhile investment. This book is actually far more than that.

SPWcoverThe book was written in parallel to the UK MOD’s Defence Wargaming Handbook (reviewed on PAXsims here) with the intention of providing an expanded practitioner’ guide to those tasked with actually designing and delivering games. Wargaming stakeholders who need to know what a wargame is and why they should want one only need the shorter volume. For those tasked with putting the message into practice this new volume rehearses similar ideas and arguments but with more detailed thoughts and copious practical guidance. This common alignment is important because if your boss has a copy of the Wargaming Handbook and is looking motivated to get some wargaming done, then there is nothing in the Practitioner’s Handbook will contradict anything that the boss is expecting!

While Graham Longley-Brown has many years of experience in wargaming with the British military he took the decision to not limit his new book to his own perspectives and ideas. A supporting cast of experts have been included, each making niche contributions. The guest list reads like a who’s who of the core community that the Connections UK meetings are built around. Indeed PAXsims had to really scrape the bottom of the barrel to find a reviewer who was not a contributing author to this volume.

The book is divided into four parts. These address in turn wargaming fundamentals, the conditions for successful wargames, the wargame development lifecycle and practicing successful wargames.  In short these combine to illustrate the why, what and how of modern professional wargames. This is very much a resource to dip into, rather than to read cover-to-cover. At over 450 pages there is an awful lot of detail but it is very well structured and set out so that the reader can dive into any section and glean useful advice in support of their own efforts. That said, I did find the layout a little confusing in paces. In some areas there are lots of subheadings, quotes and inset verbatim text from the Wargaming Handbook which make the document feel a little fractured. In addition the guest contributors have contributed a mix of stand-alone paragraphs or chapters-within-chapters which contribute to the sense of fragmentation. Taken as a whole the book is an excellent resource, even if opening to a page at random can sometimes be a bit confusing. Starting at the beginning of a section and reading through the advice that Graham and his guest contributors have assembled on a topic in sequence is definitely the way to go.

In conclusion, this book captures very well the state of the art in professional military wargaming in the UK. If you are interested in designing or running smaller-scale games and/or games outside of the military environment then some elements of the book may be of less immediate value. This is after all the handbook for professionals running professional games.  That said, whatever kind of game you design or play you can’t fail to find something insightful and inspiring in this book.

Ben Taylor

 


 

UPDATE. Graham Longley-Brown sent on some comments, which I’ve appended to the review so everyone is sure to see them.

Hi Ben, and thank you for your kind words. I’d like to add a comment and make an offer to anyone wondering whether to buy the book.

First, although the book is inevitably written from my UK perspective, I’ve done all I can to include contributions from around the world, so I’d push back slightly at the implication that the book offers a UK-centric view. Indeed, all contributed chapters were from US folk and a Canadian (Rex 😊). Many of the points I make are indeed sourced from Connections UK, but that conference encompasses a truly international family. I attribute comments where I can, but much else of what I consider to be best practice I have picked up from fantastic international speakers at Connections UK and elsewhere.

Second, I agree wholeheartedly that the book should be dipped in to, but chapters read from their beginning. Respecting all the different perspectives offered by contributors and advice from reviewers and commentators led to a large amount of sometimes overlapping information that could be difficult to prise apart. If anyone asks, I will gladly send them the mind maps I used to structure the overall book and each chapter (or post them here if Rex thinks that appropriate). These show the contents and structure of each chapter at a glance, as you can see below.Contents v7.7.jpg

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Finally, thanks to Ben and Rex for making the – considerable! – time to review the book. Successful Professional Wargames is an attempt to spread best practice and stimulate debate, so it’s great to see it on PAXsims, which is so effective in doing the same thing.


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Simulation & Gaming (December 2019)

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The latest edition of Simulation & Gaming 50, 6 (December 2019) is now available.

Articles

  • Interbank Interest-Rate Model for the Banking Business of a Multi-Industry Game
    • Precha Thavikulwat and Bosco Wing Tong Yu
  • FASim: A 3D Serious Game for the First Aid Emergency
    • Samira Benkhedda and Fatima Bendella
  • Simulation as a Tool to Promote Professional Identity Formation and Patient Ownership in Medical Students
    • Lillie Tien, Tasha R. Wyatt, Matthew Tews, and A. J. Kleinheksel
  • Making Language Real: Developing Communicative and Professional Competences Through Global Simulation
    • Yuddy Perez and Paige Poole
  • PY-RATE ADVENTURES: A 2D Platform Serious Game for Learning the Basic Concepts of Programming With Python
    • Grigorios Sideris and Stelios Xinogalos
  • Being an Educator and Game Developer: The Role of Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Non-Commercial Serious Games Production
    • Jonas Linderoth and Björn Sjöblom
  • Psychometric Testing of a Value-Achievement-Cost Motivation Survey for 12th Grade Health Sciences Students for Use in Simulation-Based-Games
    • Kevin R. Glover and Alec Bodzin
  • Learner-Controlled Practice Difficulty and Task Exploration in an Active-Learning Gaming Environment
    • Joseph Westlin, Eric Anthony Day, and Michael G. Hughes
  • A ‘KAHOOT!’ Approach: The Effectiveness of Game-Based Learning for an Advanced Placement Biology Class
    • Serena M. Jones, Priya Katyal, Xuan Xie, Madeleine P. Nicolas, Eric M. Leung, Damon M. Noland, and Jin Kim Montclare
  • Cross-Cultural Learning in Gameplay: BAFÁ BAFÁ, Persuasive Technology, and the Exploration of Intercultural Sensitivity
    • Jessica Wendorf Muhamad and Fan Yang

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WotR podcast: The (war)games we play

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The latest War on the Rocks podcast features Ellie Bartels, ED McGrady, and Peter Perla discussing—what else?—wargaming. You’ll find it here.

If you read War on the Rocks, you’ve noticed there’s a lively debate over the state of wargaming in the Department of Defense. After senior leaders pushed for a renewed emphasis on wargaming several years ago, are these games any good? Are they doing what they need to be doing for the U.S. military? If not, who is at fault — the gaming community or the customers sitting in the five-sided building? To tackle these questions and more, we gathered a gifted group of gamesome and gallant gamers. Join Ryan’s conversation with Ellie Bartels, ED McGrady, and Peter Perla.


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Invicta: How Did Wargaming Shape the War in the Pacific?

The Invicta YouTube channel posted another excellent video on wargaming last month, this time focusing on the impact of wargaming on WWII in the Pacific theatre.

In this interview, US Naval War College Museum Curator, Rob Doane, talks us through the naval history of wargaming in the 20th century. We begin by discussing US navy planning in the lead up to war which includes the eventual rainbow plan and war plan orange. We then look at how wargaming influenced naval warfare from the strategic to the tactical level. These impacted battles like Pearl Harbor, Midway, and the Island Hopping campaign across the Pacific. Finally we discuss the specifics of US vs Japan naval wargaming conducted by both the US Navy and the Japanese Navy.

They’ve since followed up with a couple of other Midway-themed videos, including one in which wargame designer Pete Pellegrino discuses the history of War Plan Orange and the role of the USNWC and Naval Wargaming.


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Connections US Wargaming Conference 2019 Proceedings

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The Proceedings of the 2019 Connections US Wargaming Conference is now available thanks to Mark Leno, Wargame Analyst, Department of Strategic Wargaming at the US Army War College.

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