PAXsims

Conflict simulation, peacebuilding, and development

AFTERSHOCK at the Université de Technologie de Troyes

The following game summary was provided by Gilles Deleuze, a sessional lecturer at UTT.


This session was organized as part of the 2nd year of Master IMSGA (Master Ingénierie et Management en Sécurité Globale Appliquée), and the “Crisis Management” chair of the UTT (Université de Technologie), in the Grand Est region of France. The 12 students have a background in industrial safety, political science, firefighting.

This was the first time AFTERSHOCK was used in a training course in UTT, and probably in France. The aim was to focus on importance of coordination, logistics and communication during emergency management. At another level, it was an opportunity for a discussion about serious gaming and its benefits in the Master IMSGA and training for Crisis Management.

French rules translation and aids were used. Two tables were organized in parallel. On one table, the facilitation was done by a peer, with some experience of the game. Eventually, there were some misunderstanding of the rules, and the facilitator proposed to stop the game at turn 2 and join the other table

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10.00 : Start, 10.30:  Turn 2, 10.50 : Turn 3, 11.25 : Turn 4, 12.00 : Break, 13.00: Restart Turn 5, 13.30 : Turn 6, 13.45 : End of session

At the other table,  the facilitation was done by the session lecturer, with experience of the game. After a round for explanation, the game went right.

The root causes of the success, are the high lelel of coordination since the beginning, especially between UN and HADR-TF, the strategy of Carana, investing a lot on clusters, which permitted to draw valuable coordination cards, and a some luck, as very few district resolutions were drawn at the beginning, especially for the semi rural area, which was voluntary left aside in the emergency policy. Also the players took care of media attention.

The debriefing led to following conclusions and proposals for an efficient use of Aftershock in the Master IMSGA at UTT

  • Require a gamemaster with experience dedicated to each table.
  • Not very fun at the beginning, then the players liked the challenge to achieve together the success of the mission.
  • Prefer to learn by playing rather than reading the rule book (too complex and long to read before the game, maximum 10 pages for a rule set in this context).
  • The game highlights the importance of cooperation. The players were very cooperative and succeded with an high margin
  • Realistic, good level of modeling of logistics issues, but a price to pay in complexity
  • Good for an initiation to crisis management before an exercice with more actors and software based simulator done during the Masters.
  • The « hardware » support permitted more interaction between players and a global view of the situation compared to a software based simulator
  • Strong agreement to continue in the next year courses especially before the large scale crisis exercise.

AFTERSHOCK feedback.jpg

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One response to “AFTERSHOCK at the Université de Technologie de Troyes

  1. Rex Brynen 11/11/2018 at 11:26 am

    Thanks for the game summary, Gilles!

    From our experience, educational games of AFTERSHOCK usually work best if players are NOT given the rules instead. We find that a 15 minute rules briefing (via powerpoint, for example) at the start is enough, with additional rules introduced and explained during game play as becomes necessary. If players are given the rulebook they just worry too much about trying to remember everything.

    Your point about needing experienced gamemasters is an important one, I think (for this of any other educational game).

    I notice that you used a fixed sequence for the turns. I almost always used the timed gamed option, where players face a 2hour countdown clock. I find it increases the sense of urgency.

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